Access Training Student

For many young people today, it's easy to think of university as an automatic route - the default next step after leaving school. With fewer vacancies and greater competition, it can seem like there are not as many opportunities available nowadays as there used to be, and so going to university comes across as being the safest option.

But is the experience of university worth the enormous tuition fees and oppressive debts that come with it? Is university really the surest route to a successful career?

The answer is: no it isn't, at least not for everybody. Many other equally prosperous options are often overlooked by parents, teachers and students alike.

What does university cost?

In 2012, university tuition fees in England almost tripled, going from £3,375 per year to £9,000 per year. At the time, students were promised increased value for money, a far higher quality of university teaching, and far better future prospects - and if the higher fees actually were justified by a far higher quality of learning and a better future for students, then perhaps this could be seen as a fair deal. But with the number of students increasing each year, the value of a degree has if anything fallen since 2012.

And that's not the only problem. The latest report on student debt by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) revealed that graduate students are currently facing a lifetime of debt, averaging around £57,000. On top of tuition fees, which are continually increasing,  this extortionate lifetime bill is made even heftier when maintenance fees and general living costs are taken into account.

So unless a university education is undoubtedly, unquestionably what you want to pursue, why saddle yourself with such a huge backlog of debt?

Is it worth it?

Many students who started university courses after fees were increased have now completed their degrees, but a lot of them are not doing too well; according to The National Union of Students, nearly half of all students who attended university as undergraduates in 2012 are now back to living with their parents.

And the struggle to find employment is only going to become more difficult, according to Sharon Walpole (the Chief Executive of Not Going To Uni, an organisation devoted to spreading awareness of options other than university to help young people secure a strong future). Walpole warns that graduate intakes for large employers will be reduced when an apprenticeship levy is passed in 2017. This levy will include an investment of £2.5 billion into funding apprenticeship training, resulting in an influx of apprenticeship placements and less room for graduates.

With more and more graduates achieving university degrees, things are only likely to become worse, with more competition, fewer opportunities, and less room for work. Read this article to find out how newly-graduated students are finding life after university, and how successful they have been in finding work

What else can your child do?

Leaving university owing £40,000+ is no way to enter the world of work, and a debt of that scale can be a huge financial and mental burden, not only for the students themselves but for the families who then have to support them. With far less priority now being made for graduate employees, finding work is becoming extremely difficult.

If you are thinking of attending university, and are not 100% certain about this choice, we implore you to consider all the available options. If academia is not your forte - if you are better with physical, hands-on work - then the trade industry might be just what you’re looking for, and Access Training is the best establishment in the UK to train and qualify aspiring tradespeople.

Please give us a call today on 0800 345 7492, and enquire about the courses we have on offer. Our course advisors will be happy to give you all the information you require.

Alternatively, select one of the following options to find out more:

The path to becoming a plumber, or any type of tradesperson for that matter, is traditionally seen as being long and limited: several years of training as an apprentice alongside a professional whose main interest is the job at hand (and not the eager apprentice looking over their shoulder). This image, some might feel, isn't particularly inspiring, and might even deter people from pursuing a trade career. However, this model is not the only way, nor is it the best way, of becoming a professional tradesperson.

Here at Access Training, we offer intensive plumbing courses in a professional and private training centre where the main focus is on teaching, rather than working, and your chances of learning how to do quality work quickly are far higher. Not only that, but our intensive courses are much shorter and more efficient, giving you a range of experience in a matter of weeks, rather than years.

We understand that some might approach a fast-track course offered by a private training college such as Access Training with suspicion - after all, how can a trade, something traditionally considered to require years of experience, be taught to a high enough standard in only a matter of weeks?

At first glance, it certainly seems implausible, but when you take a closer look into what the old-style apprenticeship process actually consists of, you might be inclined to think otherwise...

5 Reasons Why You Should Choose a Fast-Track Course

1) It takes less time.

This might go without saying, but a fast-track course takes far less time than an apprenticeship and the advantage of this is phenomenal.

Not only does it save you several years of valuable time, but it also means that you can begin working and earning much sooner. In the time it takes to complete a full apprenticeship, you could earn back the investment you made for a private training course ten times over!

2) It produces better results.

The feedback we receive from the companies who employ our students is largely supportive of the fast-track system. They claim that students trained on fast-track courses retain more information than those who have been training in apprenticeships for years.

Students are excited and enthused by their quick development on the fast-track course and are able to capitalise on this, increasing their employability, whereas those who have spent years as apprentices might have become less enthusiastic about their occupation.

In other words, you're more likely to still want to do the job after a fast-track course than an apprenticeship.

3) It involves intensive learning.

Back in the days of apprenticeships, the main style of learning was through observation, and very little else. For example, an aspiring plumber would have to spend a few hours a week following a qualified plumber from job to job, usually doing menial tasks like making tea and carrying tools.

Old style apprenticeships took years because the majority of time was spent shadowing the qualified worker and learning very slowly, not by experience or practice.

A fast-track course constantly involves learning about theory and is very hands-on, so that the skills you learn are put into immediate practice.

In a week, every single day on any trades course would be entirely dedicated to learning everything you need to know about that particular trade, instead of it being slowly drip-fed to you over a number of years.

4) The teacher's focus is on you.

In a typical apprenticeship scenario, the professional worker will most likely be focusing very little on the young aspiring apprentice eagerly looking over their shoulder. Rather, they will be concentrating on the job at hand, wanting to get it done to a high standard and in the shortest time possible.

Training to be a plumber

As a professional who might have years of experience in the trade, any questions the apprentice would have might seem tedious and are likely to be either ignored or not answered in full. As a result, very little is actually learnt.

However, in a private college, the tutors' jobs require them to do exactly the opposite: to ensure that the students are fully equipped with the knowledge and skills they need in order to become skilled professionals. They are patient with newcomers, willing to fully explain theories and ready to take time to demonstrate procedures.

It's no surprise that apprenticeships take so long to complete - the difference is enormous.

5) You'll still get 'on-site' experience.

One possible argument to be made against fast-track courses is that they don't provide 'on-site experience' in the same way that apprenticeships do.

However, this can only be a good thing. On-site experience of the kind provided by apprenticeships still involves little or no practical or theory training, and is, in essence, quite useless - one might as well pay a visit to a construction site and watch the builders working.

However, as a privately-funded company, Access Training has the necessary resources to provide excellent facilities that are designed to simulate real working environments. Bathrooms, radiators, boilers and walls are among a variety of home appliances and structures you will be practising on during your course, in which the skills you learn can be put to immediate good use and be quickly developed as a result.

This style of teaching creates an effective fusion between having practical experience and essential knowledge.

Although apprenticeships are still considered as being the natural step on the route to a traditional working life, they are becoming increasingly a thing of the past: an inefficient, rusting machine in a new age of development.

A fast-track course is the best way to ensure workers are enthusiastic and skilled professionals by the end of their training. Enquire today about a course at Access Training - our professional course advisers will be guide you in the right direction.

how to become a property developer
 
If you’re wondering how to become a property developer, then you’ve come to the right place. You need more than the ability to find a cheap property, do it out and sell it on. Property development requires a lot of planning. Here you can learn how to become a property developer.

6 Tips on How to Become a Property Developer

First things first, to become a property developer, you need to decide whether your plan is to buy-to-let or buy-to-sell. There are advantages to both; it just depends on what you personally want to get out of property development. 
 
If for example, your goal is to quickly increase your capital then buy-to-sell is the route for you. This short-term strategy will enable you to make a faster return on your investment. In fact, the sooner you renovate a property for a quick sale, the more profit you’ll make.
 
On the other hand, if your plan is to provide an income which can one day replace your current salary, then buy-to-let is for you. This long-term strategy allows you to build up a portfolio of rental properties, so you can achieve capital growth with the rental income from tenants. As long you have a deposit of at least 25%, you should have no problem getting a buy-to-let mortgage.
  • Consider ROI and the Rental Yield  

Whether you’re planning on undertaking a buy-to-let strategy or a buy-to-sell one, rental yield is crucial. Why? Well, even if you’re planning on selling up, you could be sitting on a property that just won’t sell. 
 
If you’re wondering what rental yield is, it’s the return that a property investor is estimated to achieve through rent on a property. To calculate rental yield, you measure the annual rental income against the property’s value. A good gross yield is considered to be 10% and, of course, this can increase if there are multiple occupants such as students. 
 
When selling properties, a 30% ROI is what you should aim for to effectively generate profits.
 
property development
  • Location, Location, Location 

The location of where you purchase your properties is the key to becoming a property developer. However, don’t make the mistake of buying in a location that’s already doing well. Instead, find a location that’s on the rise and make a healthy profit by buying early.  
  • Don’t Pay More Than You Need to  

While this may sound like common sense, you may be tempted to pay over the odds for a property in hope of selling it on for more money. However, in property development, you make more money when you buy a property than when you sell, so negotiating on the price of a property is essential. 
  • Consider Timing 

Don’t rush into buying a property. Even if you feel pressured to, it’s important that you get to know the market and the area before buying. 
 
Once you’ve found a property in the right location, that’s when you need to start acting fast. The quicker you can turn a property around, the sooner you can make a return on your investment.
  • Bear Your Buyer or Renter in Mind 

It might be tempting to create your dream property when you’re doing up houses, but it’s important not to get carried away. Always consider your target buyer or renter to ensure that you appeal to them and stay within your budget.
  • Ensure You Have Property Development Finance in Place 

As a property developer, you’ll need to be in a stable financial position. If you’re not, then it’s worth talking to property finance experts who will be able to advise you on that all-necessary finance you’ll need.
 
Now you know the all-important things to consider in order to become a property developer, why not help yourself achieve your goals by enrolling onto one of our property development courses? You’ll learn a range of skills, as well as everything you need to know to start a career as a property developer. 
 
Read more: 
 
 
 

How to Become a Qualified Tiler

 
If you’re wondering how to become a qualified tiler, you’ve come to the right place. We’ll tell you everything you need to know, from the qualifications you’ll need to the skills you’ll require. Find out what you need to do to start on a new career path as a qualified tiler. Here's our advice for those wondering how to become a tiler:
 

What Qualifications Will I Need?

 
Typically, to become a tiler you’ll need a qualification in wall and floor tiling along with experience in the tiling trade. There are various courses that will enable you to start a new career as a tiler; the right one for you depends on what type of qualification you wish to gain. Here at Access Training, we offer an Essential Tiling Course, Professional Tiling Course and DIY Tiling Course.
 
If you’re completely new to the industry, our Essential Tiling Course is ideal. Whereas our DIY Tiling Course is geared towards a DIY enthusiast, who wishes to carry out small tiling jobs around the home. 
 
Our Professional Tiling Course will kick-start that career in tiling you’ve always wanted, even if you sign onto the course as a beginner.
 

What Skills Are Required? 

 
There are a number of skills that will help you to become a qualified tiler. These include:
 
• Mathematical 
• Customer service
• Practical
• Attention to detail 
• Organisational 
• Creative
 
However, if you don’t possess these skills then this shouldn’t stop you from a career in tiling. You’ll develop these essential skills, in addition to others, while undertaking a tiling course. For example, you’ll learn how to calculate quantities of tiles and grout needed for a job, as well as how to cut around intricate shapes. 
 
After completing a tiling course, you’ll not only obtain an accredited qualification, you’ll possess an enhanced skill set too. 


How Much do Tilers Earn?

 
Naturally, you’re going to want to know roughly how much you’ll earn as a qualified tiler. Like with most jobs, this can vary significantly. However, as a newly qualified tiler you can expect to earn anything between £17,000 and £20,000.
 
As an experienced tiler, you could earn up to £30,000 or better yet, up to £38,000 if you’re extremely skilled in the tiling industry. If you wish to progress further, why not combine your tiling career with plastering or painting and decorating? You’ll be able to expand your expertise as a tradesperson as well as progress financially.
 

Choose Access Training 

 
Now you know how to become a qualified tiler, why not enrol onto a tiling course with Access Training today? You’ll be on track to achieving the career you’ve always dreamed of.
 

Access Training

 
Read More:
 
 
 

Labourer

 
If you feel stuck in a dead-end job or simply aren’t enjoying your career anymore, then you’re likely to be weighing up your career options right now. Family members may encourage you to be a labourer if you’re a practical person, but do you often wonder ‘what is a labourer?’ and ‘what does a labourer do?’. Well, you’ve come to the right place. Find out if a career as a labourer is for you. More...
Brexit and trade
 
When Britain voted to leave the European Union last year the pound fell to its lowest since 1985, showing that the effects of Brexit were already doing damage to the economy. It’s now slowly beginning to rise again, however, some areas (such as the trade sector) are still feeling the effects. More...

So, you’re nearing the end of your trade training at one of our centres and you’ve just found out you’ve been successful at a recent interview for what appears to be your dream job. But before you sign your name on the dotted line, make sure to make these final checks: More...


Whether you dream of becoming a professional plumber or would simply like to improve your skills so you become handier around the home, a great place to start is understanding the most common plumbing problems and how to fix them. 

From dripping taps to leaking pipes, here are just a few of the most common water woes you may come across: More...



We’re career change experts and we’ve trained thousands of people who have decided to take a new direction and train towards a trade job. However, if you’re considering shaking things up, stop and think – is it really your career you need to change? And if so, how are you going to go about it? More...

 
It’s easier than you may think to ruin your career in 140 characters or less, as social media is prevalent in everyday life. 
So, if you’re conducting training with us here at Access Training and will soon be seeking a new career listen up! Here are a few things you should consider when it comes to your social media activity whilst job hunting. More...

From safety goggles and steel-toe boots, to using the right tools for the job, it’s important that plumbers keep themselves safe when training and on the job. Here are 10 top tips for keeping you safe: More...


First comes studying for a trade qualification at one of our centres, then, once you’ve passed, comes the job interviews. 

This can seem a little daunting, especially if it’s your first experience since deciding to make a career change or leaving full time education. So, in order to give your confidence a little boost, here are a few top tips which’ll get you prepared in no time at all. More...