Here at Access Training, we constantly stress the importance of safe electrical practice in the workplace, but this unfortunate incident really brings it home!

On the 12th of April 2017, two demolition workers were tasked with removing electrical distribution equipment from a switchgear room at the Molecular Products site in Essex. The principal contractor had told the men that the electrical equipment they were dealing with had been fully isolated.

Foolishly, one man attempted to 'reassure his colleague' that the electricals had in fact been isolated by throwing a metal crowbar at the 400v ac equipment.

Unfortunately, when the crowbar came into contact with the live electricals it created a flashover (explosion) at temperatures of several thousand degrees which led immediately to quite a devastating fire. The man who through the crowbar, Mr Banks, suffered serious burns and was taken into hospital.

HSE investigated this incident and found that the task had not been properly planned at that suitable control measures hadn't been put in place. The principal contractor had failed to follow the procedures stating that all electrical equipment should be treated as live until properly checked and confirmed to be isolated. 

The Consequences:

  • Mr Banks sustained horrific burns & injuries
  • Russel Haigh and Stuart Haigh pled guilty to breaching Regulation 3 of the Electricity at Work Regulations  Act 1989 and we both fined £80,000
  • AJ Wadhams & Co Ltd pled guilty to breaching section of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 197 and was fined £80,000

HSE inspector Adam Hills said:

“This incident has had a significant impact on Mr Banks life and the injuries could so very easily have been fatal. Had the companies followed the control measures outlined in their respective risk assessments, then this incident would not have occurred. Never assume that an electrical supply is disconnected. Always check with the distribution network operator or a qualified electrician to obtain written proof of isolation before commencing work.”

Read more about this incident here >

 Electrical Training

If there's one thing to take away from this, it's that working with electricals can be incredibly dangerous (and costly) if something goes wrong. That's why we can't stress enough how important it is that you receive the proper electrical training before carrying out this kind of work!

Here at Access Training Academies, we offer electrical training for students of all ages and abilities. If you're interested in pursuing a career in electrical work, come and learn the necessary skills and practices at one of our training centres. 

View Our Electrical Courses >

If you have any questions about our electrical courses, or to arrange a visit to one of our test centres, please don't hesitate to get in touch. You can call us on 0800 345 7492 or email us at info@accesstraininguk.co.uk.

Be a carpenter

Carpentry is one of the oldest occupations there is, dating all the way back to Ancient Egypt and beyond. The Bible, of course, features myriad references to carpentry, from Noah and his ark to Joseph, husband of Mary.

That being said, a lot has changed since Biblical times - it's unlikely that Noah or Joseph had any formal carpentry qualifications. But what credentials does a modern-day carpenter need in order to succeed?

 

What do I need to become a carpenter?

Carpentry isn't like gas or electrical work - there's no specific certification (or set of certifications) that you're legally required to possess. Strictly speaking, the only thing you need to do in order to enter the trade and carry out on-site work is demonstrate your competence as a carpenter.

There are a number of valid ways to do this, but one of the most popular options is to complete a portfolio of work and earn the NVQ Level 2 Carpentry qualification.

 

How do I get my NVQ?

Well, hold on now. Before you can start working towards the NVQ Level 2 certification, you'll need to actually learn carpentry.

Again, you have a number of different options here. Some people choose to do an apprenticeship, working alongside an established carpenter and gradually learning the trade from them. Mind you, it can take a number of years to go from apprentice to fully-fledged carpenter, so if you're looking to start your new career sooner rather than later, you may prefer to enrol on an accredited carpentry training course.

View Our Carpentry Courses >

You can start your carpentry training from the comfort of your own home - we now offer live online training, allowing you to learn fundamental carpentry skills in a virtual classroom setting. Click here to find out more about our e-learning options.

Once you've learned all the skills a carpenter needs to know - and you feel confident that you're proficient enough to start work - then you can begin the NVQ process. This involves:

  • Attending a formal induction session
  • Completing a portfolio of evidence (including photographs of the work you've completed and written testimonies from witnesses)
  • Submitting your finished portfolio for assessment

If you're already a competent carpenter and you think you're ready to earn your NVQ Level 2 Carpentry qualification, click here to find out Access Training can help. Otherwise, use the links below to find out more about our carpentry training packages for learners of all experience levels.

Carpentry Training Packages >   Speak to a Course Advisor >

 

Handyman courses

Specialising in general home repairs and domestic maintenance, a handyman is very much a 'Jack of all trades'.

Covering everything from hanging picture frames to building flatpack furniture, a good handyman will be well-versed in the art of small jobs within the homestead – after all, why should Thor get to be the only hero with a hammer?

If you're a dab hand with a drill and a superstar with a spanner, you yourself could have the makings of a fine handyman (or handywoman).

Do you have the skills to pay the bills? Become a doctor of DIY and take your domestic talents to the next level with a handyman course from Access Training.

View DIY Carpentry Course >

 

Why take a handyman course?

Whether you want to set up your own handyman business or simply brush up on some essential domestic skills, a handyman course can be a great way to broaden your horizons and enhance your abilities.

Completing a course on the do's and don’ts of DIY will allow you to easily overcome common home maintenance issues, save money on household repairs and, best of all, provide you with the necessary knowledge and understanding to be independent within the home.

Outside of that, handyman skills can be a great way to supplement your income by carrying out odd jobs for others. Better still, a relevant training course could even provide you with a solid base on which to build your very own business.

 

Which handyman course is right for me?

Often grouped together under the banners of 'Property Maintenance' or 'Home Maintenance', handyman courses offer a whole host of useful domestic skills to learn.

From plumbing and bricklaying to painting and decorating, the list of handyman courses available across the UK is vast and wide-ranging. Finding the right one for you can depend largely on your specific needs and aspirations.

If you simply want to brush up on some household skills, a standard DIY course should fit the bill nicely; however, if you want something a little meatier to prepare you for a professional venture, you may want to consider a more comprehensive training programme.

 

Our DIY training courses

At Access Training, we offer two primary DIY courses, both of which are designed to help you become more independent in the home and give you the functional expertise to easily overcome typical household headaches.

The DIY courses currently available from Access Training are:

  • DIY Carpentry Course - From tool handling and basic cutting to hanging doors and fitting locks, our DIY Carpentry Course covers a wide variety of tasks in order to help you improve your practical carpentry skills around the home.

  • DIY Plastering Course - Providing you with all the basic know-how on the art of plastering, our DIY Plastering Course is ideal for anyone looking to take on a domestic plastering job, covering everything from mixing materials to rendering walls.

 

Further training courses

In addition to the DIY courses outlined above, we also provide a number of other 'Essential' courses that are ideal for anyone looking to get to grips with a skill they've never tried before.

These include:

These entry-level courses may be considered a step up from the DIY level, providing a superb foundation if you're looking to turn professional in the near future.

Get in touch now to speak with a course advisor >

CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: To help our learners stay safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, we are now offering live online training sessions. This means that you can participate in virtual classroom sessions from the comfort of your own home and rewatch each tutorial as many times as you wish. Of course, there's no substitute for hands-on experience, so the practical portion of your training course will still be delivered in person at our fully-equipped training centre. Contact Access Training now to find out more about our unique training packages.

 

Whoever said “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks” must have had one very lazy, disobedient dog. After all, it’s also been said that “life begins at 40” – so why not give your career a new lease of life by retraining with us?

Becoming an electrician at 40 years old may seem like a drastic change of pace, but it can be a welcome transition if you're looking to shake up your professional life or simply enhance your existing skillset.

 

becoming an electrician at 40

 

Why become an electrician?

The number of workers aged 40+ seeking a new career path has seen a steady increase in recent years, and trade work has emerged as a top choice for those brave enough to change their trajectory. But why?

Barring some drastic technological advancement, most British homes and workplaces are going to need a steady supply of electricity for the foreseeable future, making energy-related trades a great choice for anyone looking to pursue a new career path.

What’s more, the autonomy that comes from learning a trade can be a real breath of fresh air. Getting some electrical qualifications under your belt not only opens up opportunities with established companies like the “Big Six” (British Gas, EDF, Scottish Power, E.ON, Npower, and SSE), it also creates a clear and realistic route to self-employment, allowing you to set your own hours, be your own boss, and work for yourself.

 

How to become an electrician at 40

There are many reasons why a person might want to become an electrician at 40, ranging from a voluntary career change to unforeseen redundancy. Whatever your reason, the path to a successful electrician career starts with a single step in the right direction.

If you’re reading this blog – congratulations! That first step starts here. So kudos for being proactive…now what?

Well, the road to becoming a qualified electrician has three primary stops along the way:

 

1. Training

Typically achieved on a full or part-time basis, training will provide you with the essential knowledge and expertise on how to do the job efficiently, safely and professionally.

 

2. Work Experience

As with any job, practical experience is vital if you're going to transfer your knowledge of electrical theory into a practical, real-world environment.

 

3. Assessment

Once you’re equipped with the theoretical knowledge and practical experience, a final assessment will determine if you’re ready to become an electrician and enter the trade. This part is important, because practising electricians are required to hold certain qualifications before they can start working.

 

While the specifics of your electrical training programme will vary depending on the course you choose, these three steps provide a basic blueprint of what to expect when you enrol.

Electrical Training Courses >

After you’ve completed each stage on this electrifying journey, you’ll reach your final destination as a fully-qualified electrician!

 

Become an electrician

 

Benefits of retraining at 40

While it may seem like a daunting task, becoming an electrician at 40 is far from impossible. In fact, it can be a hugely exciting journey for anyone brave enough to make the leap.

Don’t let Father Time put you off either – you’re never too old to learn something new. What’s more, mature students can have the hot hand over their younger counterparts in a variety of ways.

Mature students typically have a firm career path in mind when they re-enter education, along with a clear idea of where they want to go once qualified. Time away from the educational highways and by-ways can also provide career clarity and motivation to truly knuckle down.

For mature students, the decision to retrain is a conscious one made individually (unlike many teenage students, who can be easily swayed and led astray by friends and family influence). This can also translate into a more focused approach to learning, making the temptation to miss a session or neglect course revision seem a lot less attractive.

Additionally, life experience can be a real asset in the classroom, adding another dimension to your approach to learning. The self-discipline needed to succeed on a trade training course can be easily transferred from personal to professional life experience; the same can be said for organisation and prioritising.

 

The perks of becoming an electrician at 40

From a professional standpoint, there are also further benefits to being aged 40+. As a general rule of employment, employers typically like mature graduates of any ilk as they come ready-made with many key attributes attached. These employer-friendly specs include two important things: experience and qualifications.

While a younger, newly-qualified electrician may have youthful exuberance on their side, they can also lack experience in the working world and can also at times still be relatively immature from a professional standpoint.

What’s more, customers are also said to feel most comfortable with a tradesperson over 40. A consumer study by Watersafe showed that customers believed the most trusted age of a tradesperson to be 41. In fact, the most trusted age bracket was 36 to 49, achieving a whopping 50% of the overall vote.

 

Make the jump and become an electrician!

With retirement age getting higher seemingly all the time, staying put in a job you hate is as good as a life sentence. In fact, the feeling of Sunday night dread and Monday morning misery can be a prison in itself.

A career change can be a real shot in the arm, making your working hours more enjoyable but also changing the way you live your life. As the old saying goes: “if you love your job, you’ll never work a day in your life”. Love your job and live your life with a career change that lights a spark inside you.

 

So what are you waiting for? Take the power back into your hands with an electrical training course today! For more information on our electrician courses, click the buttons below and explore a new career now.

Electrical Training Courses   Contact Access Training

If you didn't already know the consequences of working as a gas engineer without being on the Gas Safe register, here is another stark reminder. 

Liverpool Magistrates recently fined a man, Kevin Shephard, for working on gas fittings and issuing Landlord Gas Safety Certificates, despite no longer being Gas Safe registered. Health and Safety Executive (HSE) carried out an investigation which showed that Mr Shephard was registered with the Gas Safe register over several periods between November 2013 and June 2016, but his registration lapsed in June 2016, along with his gas competence qualifications. 

Mr Shephard continued to carry out gas work and maintenance without renewing his registration or qualifications, so was, therefore, carrying out gas work illegally. Mr Shephard pled guilty to breaching several gas safety regulations, was fined £2000 and had to pay legal costs of £2000 also. 

HSE inspector Jane Carrol said: 

"Kevin Shephard carried out gas work which he knew he wasn't properly registered to do. All gas work must be done by registered Gas Safe engineers to ensure the highest standards are met and to prevent injury and loss of life."

How Do I Get Gas Safe Registered?

Joining the Gas Safe Register will ensure you avoid illegal gas work penalties. To get on the gas safe register, you need to pass an ACS assessment - an assessment that can only be completed if you learn the necessary skills, theory, and procedures. 

If you'd like to become a fully-qualified gas plumber, Access Training Academies can help! We offer a selection of different gas courses that will teach you all the necessary skills to pass your ACS assessments, click below to view and enquire today! 

Browse Our Gas Courses >

 

To work continuously as a gas engineer you will need to complete reassessments to stay on the Gas Safe Register. We can help you with your reassessments too!

Get in touch to learn more about our training courses!

First Name *
Surname *
Telephone Number *
E-mail address *
Ask A Question *
 
Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character
Enter Letters (No Spaces) *