Electricians vs plumbers

It's well known that tradespeople make a decent amount of money. Both plumbing and electrical work can be very lucrative trades - but how much do plumbers and electricians actually make? And who earns the most?

Before we dive into that question, a disclaimer: it's rare for two tradespeople to have exactly the same salary, and earnings largely depend on an individual's work experience and qualifications. For the purposes of this blog post, we'll be looking at statistical averages, primarily those provided by the Office of National Statistics.

So who, on average, earns the most money?

More...

Anybody who’s lost their job, been made redundant. My advice is don’t be afraid. With hard work, preparation and the right training, you can do anything you want’ – Jimmy, Gas Trainer

 

It’s no secret that the construction industry is in great need of skilled workers. For the last few years, it has suffered from a serious skills shortage, making proposed construction projects harder and harder to achieve. 

Declining numbers of new workers entering the industry, an ageing workforce, and Brexit meaning overseas workers are more difficult to source. Demand for workers is currently at its highest level since December 2015, according to the Office for National Statistics.

The number of people entering the plumbing and heating industry, for example, declined by 4.19% over the last 16 years, from 157,400 to 150,800. If these general trends continue, where will we be in, say, five, ten, twenty, years? 

If there’s one thing the last year has taught us, it’s that the construction industry is of utmost importance to our daily lives. The public rely on construction workers to ensure basic living standards are met; they heat our homes, safely install gas appliances, and provide us with electricity. With people stuck in doors for the majority of the last year for obvious reasons, home comforts and safety have never been more important. And, it’s worth noting, demand for construction workers has never been higher.

 

‘Infrastructure is always going to need maintaining and installing. That’s why I chose a career in trades. I want my future to be safe’ – Leah, student.

 

So why is the construction industry continually struggling with the numbers of its workforce? It is a modern, vibrant industry, developing new technologies, innovative projects, and securing the next generation of infrastructure for our country. It is building hundreds of thousands of homes, hospitals, schools, and massive jobs such as HS2. These things will last multiple generations, and will transform the UK as we know it. 

The prospect of joining such a workforce ought to be seen as inspiring, and young professionals ought to be joining the industry in droves. But this message is being lost in translation, perhaps burdened by an older perception of the construction industry as a labour-intensive, male-only industry, where work is monotonous and limited. The reality couldn’t be more different: there are an incalculable amount of roles within construction, providing varied, fulfilling work for a whole range of different people, of all backgrounds and genders. This is the positive, refreshing message which needs shouting from the rooftops.

Covid-19 has threatened the livelihoods of millions of people across the country. Countless sectors have been affected, with redundancies and risk of job loss at a concerningly high level. But one industry that remained relatively secure was, you guessed it, the construction industry. Not only did wages remain stable, but they actually rose as work demand increased, with over £1000 a week a common salary for busy tradespeople. Hudson Contract, the industry’s biggest payer of subcontractors, raised their workers’ salaries by 5.6% in October, which was also the fourth consecutive month where wages went up. 

The pandemic meant that thousands of people were forced to rethink their careers. The decisions they often made resulted in them leaving their jobs, which were under threat of being lost, or had actually been lost. Career change for many seemed like an enormous undertaking – a huge upheaval which would require massive change, resources, and time. 

And indeed, the general feeling among working people is that they are unprepared for a change of career. According to a City and Guilds report, just over half (54%) of businesses have stated that they can recruit the skilled individuals they need. Most concerningly, 61% of working age adults do not feel equipped with the skills they need to unlock new opportunities for the next five years of their professional lives. 

And worse yet, 30% (the equivalent of 11 million people) have not received formal workplace training in the last five years. The answer, then, is that the workplace should integrate a continual system of training, to instill a sense of progress, ambition, and personal drive, which would account for far more people fulfilling their full professional potential. 

But it doesn’t have to be that way. Access Training prides itself on aiding people to make successful career changes – we’ve been doing it for a lot longer than Covid has been around. Our tutors are experts in preparing students not only to sit and pass exams, but to enjoy long-term careers. We offer fast-track, flexible training, which you can fit around your busy life. 

More importantly, we have developed a training structure which means that people from all walks of life, all levels of experience, can begin afresh, or build on skills they already have. During the pandemic, people from all different career backgrounds enrolled on a course with us. Whether they were from the hospitality or entertainment industries, teachers, pilots, chefs, taxi drivers, or even lawyers – they came to us for additional skills, to make themselves more employable, more financially independent and secure. 

They came to us to invest in their futures, not just to make sure that they could get by from day to day, but because they identified the construction industry as an industry in which sustainable, fulfilling employment was consistent and easy to find, providing you put the work in. 

 

‘The Fast Track training made this change of career an actual option for me and the others in my class. The tutors are there for you 24 hours a day to help. They feel more like mentors now’ – Michael, Student

 

And that’s why Access Training’s 3 Stage Training Programme is so effective. It doesn’t assume any prior knowledge, and it welcomes people whose backgrounds are not in construction. They are designed with this in mind. Not only does it guide you through the qualifications and learning, but it also ensures that you aren’t left alone once you finish your course. You leave Access Training prepared for employment, with continued guidance on how to find work, or how to set up your own business. 

Because we understand how crucial it is that aspiring tradespeople supply the country with their services and their skills. We understand that, if you have the capacity to learn, the motivation to work, then you can do anything. And we want more than anything for our students to thrive in the industry. 

So how does our 3 Stage Training Programme work? 

 

Stage 1 – Live Online Learning

Access Training Online is a tailored learning portal that allows you unlimited learning for 3 years from the comfort of your own home – repeat and use any part as many times as you like. This includes scheduled live tuition, tutor Q&As, lessons, tests, and much more. This is the perfect preparation for the next step of your course.

 

Stage 2 – Practical Training

Next you attend a training centre for the practical training part of your course. This hands-on, fast-track tuition is entirely flexible with you having the power to attend when you’re ready, equipping you with the skills and knowledge needed for professional qualifications.

 

Stage 3 – Career & Employment Support

From Day 1 we will provide you with a dedicated Career Support Officer who can give expert guidance and advice on all matters related to your exciting new career. Build your CV with us and find out about the potential job/placement opportunities with our network of Corporate Partners.

 

Access Training is here to produce the next generation of tradespeople for the UK. If a career in construction is what you want, then there’s only one place to come. 


Learn your trade. Get qualified. Make it happen.

 

 

I am a strong believer that no one should be stereotyped into specific roles and this includes the perception of men on the construction site’ – Jwerea Malik, operations manager at Balfour Beatty, and co-chair of the group’s Gender Equality Affinity Network.

 

After we spoke to our plumbing student, Leah Carney, and hearing her inspiring story, we’ve been determined to continue the dialogue surrounding women in the construction industry. 

Leah is an ambitious and driven individual: a designer who had taken to delivery driving for extra money, and then decided to train as a plumber at the outset of the pandemic. She is already qualified as a plumber, gaining new electrical qualifications, and setting up her own business. 

But Leah is just one of thousands of similarly hard-working people around the country who have made the construction industry their home and future. Over the pandemic, the construction industry has seemed to appeal to hard-working and skilled women, as a refuge from redundancy and an opportunity for a fulfilling career. According to Lianne Lawson, a construction manager who has been in the industry for 14 years:

 

The pandemic has taught all of us how quickly we can evolve and adapt to new ways of working, and I think the mindset for everyone has changed. [...] Having to work from home in many cases has opened the industry up to the possibility of more flexible working conditions.

 

It goes without saying that the construction industry should accommodate everybody who has a desire to work within it; and perhaps one inadvertent result of the pandemic is that this has happened. 

For decades, the construction industry has been perceived as a male-dominated industry. But hearing the stories of women in construction, we learn that the last decade or two has resulted in greater accessibility to footholds and successful careers for thousands of women across the UK. Since then, it has been exciting to witness the brilliant and essential contributions that women have made to the trade industry, only further demonstrating that there absolutely is a much-needed place for them within the sector.

 

When i joined the industry 10 years ago as a graduate engineer, I was, more often than not, the only woman in the room. I felt the pressure to be seen as a peer to my male colleagues. – Malik

 

Jwerea Malik also notes how, from being the only woman on a project, the industry has now developed to seeing 23% of new starters in construction being women. It’s refreshing to consider how far the construction industry has come in recent times, and these stories of success are a testimony to the freedoms and attitudes of today. 

But as important as it is to acknowledge and celebrate how far we’ve come in the construction industry, there is obviously further we can go in ensuring that everybody feels welcome, and to encourage everybody to contribute in a fast-growing and multi-faceted industry. Considering the skills shortages of today’s construction sector, and the huge demand for work, it only makes sense for the prosperity of the industry itself that we look for strong, skilled tradespeople from all aspects of society. 

 

I was considered a bit of a novelty, noticed more for my differences than the engineering skills and expertise we had in common. I felt I had to prove myself, not just in terms of delivering my work to the best of my ability, but to be seen as an equal to my teammates. The rarity of a woman on a construction site 10 years ago meant inclusion wasn’t second nature. – Malik

 

What’s more, it goes without saying that a successful business is an inclusive business. Those leaders of the trade who represent all aspects of society are those with a greater customer base, a broader image, and who ultimately thrive in a competitive market. It suits everybody to make sure that construction is not a career for the men only – frankly, why limit ourselves?

 

I think it was my own perception that I couldn’t do it, so I was trying to break that mentality, which the people around me helped to do’ – Lianne Lawson.

 

 

Success in the construction industry is all about ability, and should never be about any aspect of your gender and background. If you have an interest in joining the construction community, don’t hesitate; from an outsider perspective, it might look like a male-dominated environment, but as you can see, things are changing. It just takes some bravery, self-belief, and knowledge that you are judged on your ability and willingness to work, over any other factors.

Women in construction are no longer a novelty; they are essential to the industry’s future. Why not be a part of this future, and join women like Leah, Lianne, and Jwerea? It takes one call to Access Training to get your career on track.


Learn your trade. Get qualified. Make it happen.

 

 

 

If you read the survey carried out by the Water Regulation Advisory Scheme (WRAS) you will see that basic skills are completely lacking! The survey found that 18-24 year old adults lack basic repair skills, from unblocking a toilet to fixing a leaking tap. Only 1 in 3 know how to bleed a radiator with over 55's the most capable age groups when it comes to home plumbing tasks.

What is clear is that young people are the most challenged by these tasks with less than 30% not knowing how to change a light fitting where, in contrast nearly two thirds of over 55s are able to carry this out. The survey also found that 37% of young people could change a showerhead but double this figure were capable in the the over 55s category.

Further to this the survey showed that adults born after 1985 are increasingly unable to take on simple tasks. However, a third of millennials would in fact know how to bleed a radiator, but this is still way short of the 79% of over-55s who would be able to carry out this most basic of jobs. 

So it is conclusive that when it comes to basic home repairs, they are not an issue for those in older generations, but the capability to carry out a repair is far less in the younger generations. In fact the repair that most people are happy to carry out is bleeding a radiator:

  • Bleeding a radiator - 57%
  • Replacing a shower head - 53.3%
  • Fixing a blocked toilet - 44.6%
  • Replacing a light fixture - 44.5%
  • Fixing a leaky tap - 30.2%
  • Fixing a leaky toilet - 21.2%

What is clear from the survey is that repair tasks within the home have become something or a mystery or even a no-go for most. This is great news for tradespeople and those considering taking up a trade as there are so many tasks that home occupiers will need to be carried out by professionals, no matter how simple they are in really. 

In fact it would not be advisable for anyone to tackle a task that they were not sure about as problems and possibly dangerous scenarios can result from the most simple of tasks. It's always best to use a trained professional, someone who has the training, skill and knowledge to deal with these situations. 

At Access Training, we are always striving to provide people of all ages, young and old, with the professional level of training, knowledge and skills needed to carry out basic and complex tasks, safely and efficiently. For those looking to become skilled and qualified as a plumber, electrician, gas engineer, carpenter or plasterer, we will teach you what you need to know, allowing you the opportunity to turn basic DIY jobs into earnings and a career.

To find out how to become professionally certified in a trade such as plumbing or to simply discuss the career options available to you, call us today.

Learn your trade. Get qualified. Make it happen.




*WRAS Survey of 2000 adults in April 2019.

As government reports of cases of Covid-19 show rises to levels similar to what they were at the beginning of the pandemic, Chancellor Rishi Sunak has been forced to think again on his assurance that furlough will not be extended further than October 31st. Whilst this scheme is still set to finish on this date, he has instead extended the Job Support Scheme to help pay salaries for companies that are forced to close. 

 

‘Britain risks an unemployment crisis greater than we have seen in decades…’’

Annalise Dodds, Labour Shadow chancellor

 

Case levels are rising and local lockdowns are being implemented, and many businesses are expected to close again in order to counter the curb. Employees and companies, who have already been through alot over the last six months, are currently left in a furlough limbo. Many are questioning the levels of support they are receiving, leading to searching questions for those who may need to reskill to find future employment. 

In this latest development, trying to answer the question of what to do next is increasingly impossible for many. Fresh restrictions mean another decline back into full lockdown and a raft of redundancies for businesses who haven’t had the time or notice to prepare. Who could blame anyone for looking for another way out? A new career is the only option for many. One of our tutors, Jimmy Adkins, had some advice for those facing job losses,

 

"Anybody who's lost their job... my advice is don't be afraid. With hard work and the right training... you can do anything that you want."

Jimmy Adkins, Access Training Academies Tutor speaking on ITV Tonight

 

With jobs in jeopardy, what individuals need are alternative options: a flexible route into one of the few stable careers still viable and accessible in this climate. At Access Training we are seeing many people making the move into getting a trade - we’ve been continually training people ever since the pandemic began, and for 17 years previously - we never closed, and have given people the impetus for fresh starts, new careers, trade qualifications, and most importantly, a brighter future. These things could be awaiting you, if you decide to train and fill the often advertised skills gap in the trades.

Whatever your course of choice – whether it’s a plumbing course, a carpentry course, an electrical course, or any course within construction – Access Training can provide a route out of a seemingly unending series of reports about redundancies and job uncertainties. The construction industry is seeing an unprecedented upturn in demand, and people are needed to fill that demand. Enquire about starting a course with us today.


Learn your trade. Get qualified. Make it happen.

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