Apprentice electrician

An electrical apprenticeship is kind of like a cross between a university course and a full-time job. Apprentices carry out real-life electrical work (under the supervision of an experienced electrician, of course) and get paid for it; but they also spend part of their time in the classroom, studying their new trade and the theory that underpins it. Apprentice electricians typically spend at least 20% of their working hours studying.

Some see the time-honoured apprenticeship route as a rite of passage for budding tradespeople. But an electrical apprenticeship is rarely the most efficient way to get qualified and start your career.

 

The drawbacks of an electrical apprenticeship

An apprenticeship might sound like the best of both worlds, combining the perks of being a student (i.e. self-betterment and opportunities to make new friends) with the benefits of working (i.e. getting paid).

However, apprenticeships have two major downsides:

  • They take years to complete. According to apprenticeships.gov.uk, an apprenticeship can take anywhere from 1 to 6 years. On average, electrical apprenticeships tend to take 3 or 4 years - so if you become an apprentice at the age of 18, there's a good chance you'll turn 21 before you turn professional!

  • Apprentice electricians don't make much money. As an apprentice, you won't be paid anywhere near as much as a fully-fledged pro. According to Indeed, the average salary for an electrician in the UK is £32,415 per year - but an apprentice electrician in the UK makes just £17,467 per year. And as mentioned above, you'll have to wait a few years before you can strike out on your own and start making big money.

 

Why wait years to become a professional electrician?

If you're eager to get qualified and start your electrical career ASAP, there is a speedy alternative to the traditional apprenticeship route.

Here at Access Training Academies, we offer a selection of fast-track electrical courses that are specifically designed to turn novices into fully-qualified electricians as quickly as possible. If you're not thrilled by the prospect of spending the next few years as an apprentice - not making all that much money and working with someone else looking over your shoulder - then our training courses are the perfect alternative.

With our help, you can earn industry-recognised qualifications and achieve 'professional electrician' status in a matter of months. Contact us now to check upcoming course dates, or click the button below to explore your options.

Browse Electrician Courses >

Photo from Pixabay

Working as a carpenter

Am I too old to retrain as a carpenter?

This is a question commonly asked by people in their forties who are considering a change of career.

If you're around 40 years of age and wondering whether it's too late for you to become a carpenter, allow us to reassure you that it most certainly is not!

In this blog post, we'll take a look at the options available to you as an adult learner and how you can become a carpenter at 40+ with the help of Access Training.

More...

Thinking of becoming a plumber? Here's a preview of what an average working day might look like once you're qualified...

Plumber doing a job

Plumbers tend to rise early in the morning, often completing the first job of the day before the nation's office workers have even switched on their computers. But while those office workers will be chained to their desks for the next eight hours, a professional plumber gets to spend the day travelling around, tackling a variety of tasks in all sorts of different workplaces.

 

What jobs do plumbers do?

The jobs that make up a plumber's average working day depend (to an extent) on whether that plumber is self employed or employed by someone else.

 

Self-employed plumbers

If you've decided to set up your own business and be your own boss, you're free to pick and choose what jobs you take on. In all likelihood, domestic plumbing repairs and installations will form the majority of the work you do.

Common jobs include:

  • Stopping leaks and drips
  • Unclogging drains
  • Improving water pressure
  • Installing new pipework
  • Fitting bathrooms
  • Repairing boilers*

*Note that plumbers must be Gas Safe registered in order to work on gas boilers.

 

Plumbers employed by somebody else

If you are employed by a commercial plumbing company, your typical working day will probably look a little different from that of a self-employed domestic plumber.

Yes, there will still be plenty of leaks to fix and drains to unblock, but you may also find yourself...

  • Installing plumbing systems in new buildings
  • Maintaining large-scale water supply / waste removal systems
  • Carrying out work on public water mains

If you're not keen on the idea of spending lots of time in the van, zipping from one job to the next, then you might prefer a 'static' job that allows you to do all your work in one place. Many large businesses employ resident plumbers to carry out regular inspections and maintenance on the company's premises.

 

What hours do plumbers work?

Some plumbers work a standard nine-to-five, Monday-to-Friday week like everyone else. But there's a lot of extra money to be made if you're happy to work evenings and weekends. If your average customer is at work during the day, they'll probably want a plumber who is willing to pop by later on, when they're at home...or maybe on Saturday, when they've got the day off. And of course, some plumbing emergencies can't wait until the next weekday!

Self-employed plumbers have the freedom and the flexibility to choose their own timetable and work as many (or as few) hours as they wish. Plumbers in traditional employment usually - though not always - operate on a more rigid schedule. Both career paths have their benefits; once you've completed your training and got some professional plumbing qualifications under your belt, it will be up to you to decide which lifestyle suits you best.

Browse Our Plumbing Courses >

Further reading:

Man training for a career in electrical engineering

An electrical engineer is someone who designs electrical systems. This can mean anything from assisting with the construction of new homes to planning nationwide energy networks.

As you can probably imagine, this line of work demands a lot of expertise, but if you've got the right qualifications, a career in electrical engineering can be very lucrative indeed. According to payscale.com, the average salary for an electrical engineer in the UK is just over £32,000 per year - and some earn significantly more than that.

Electrical engineers are employed by all sorts of different industries, including:

  • Construction
  • Energy
  • Transport
  • Manufacturing
  • Defence

 

What's the Difference Between an Electrician and an Electrical Engineer?

While 'electrician' and 'electrical engineer' are often used interchangeably, they are - strictly speaking - two different professions. You wouldn't hire an electrical engineer to come and fix your oven, and most jobbing electricians aren't qualified to design large-scale electrical systems.

So what exactly is the difference? Well, this is something of an oversimplification (and there is a certain amount of overlap between the two roles) but broadly speaking, electrical engineers DESIGN the jobs that electricians then CARRY OUT. Think of the electrical engineer as a composer, and the electrician as a concert pianist; one writes the music, the other performs it.

 

How to Become an Electrical Engineer

If you simply want to work as a domestic electrician, you will need the following qualifications (which make up our Essential Electrical Course):

  • Part P Domestic Installer
  • 18th Edition Wiring Regulations
  • Building Regulations for Electrical Installations in Dwellings

If you want to pursue a career in electrical engineering, you will need to know how to design electrical systems. Our Electrical Design Course (which includes a Level 4 design and verification qualification) is recommended for candidates who already have some professional electrical experience under their belts.

Beginners who wish to forge a career in electrical engineering may be interested in our Premier Electrical Course - this comprehensive training package consists of eight different qualifications, covering everything from basic electrical theory all the way through to the design and verification of new installations. No prior knowledge or experience is required to enrol on this course.

View All Electrical Courses >

If you want to become an electrical engineer but you're not sure where to start, please contact Access Training Academies today - our course advisors will start you down the path to your new career.

Not sure what qualifications you need to work as an electrician? Read our simple guide!

Electrician qualifications

So you want to become an electrician, and you can't wait to enrol on a training course and start learning your new trade.

But there's a problem: you've been looking at the various training courses that are available for budding electricians, and each one seems to result in a different qualification. Now you're wondering which of those certificates and diplomas you actually need - which one will mark you out as a qualified electrician and enable you to turn professional?

Thing is, the world of electrical work is a rich tapestry, comprising lots of different tasks in lots of different places. There are lots of different electrician qualifications because there are lots of different electricians - some specialise in domestic installations, while others work exclusively in commercial/industrial environments. Some make a living from portable appliance testing (PAT), while others spend their days designing and installing complex electrical systems.

Still, there's no need to be baffled by the wide variety of available electrical qualifications. Here's a rough guide to some of the best-known electrician qualifications and what each one actually licenses you to do:

 

Basic Electrician Qualifications

Let's start with the qualifications that are included on our Essential Electrician Course. This a great course for beginners, consisting of three crucial electrical qualifications that just about all electrical engineers are expected to hold:

  • Part P Domestic Installer - The Part P qualification allows you to install, inspect, test and certify a broad range of domestic electrical systems. Along with the 17th Edition certificate (see below), Part P is widely recognised as the essential qualification for new electricians.

  • 17th Edition Wiring Regulations - The phrase '17th Edition' refers to the current Wiring Regulations to which British electricians must adhere. Gaining your 17th Edition certificate demonstrates that you have a good understanding of the Regulations and how to comply with them.

  • Building Regulations for Electrical Installations in Dwellings - The Building Regulations are another important piece of legislation for electricians. Obtaining this qualification demonstrates that you understand the Building Regulations as applicable to electrical installations in homes and dwellings.

 

Going Further: Advanced Electrician Qualifications

Once you have earned the above qualifications, you may wish to work towards obtaining additional qualifications so as to set yourself apart from the competition and broaden the range of jobs you're capable of undertaking. Here are some of the more advanced qualifications that Access Training can help you to achieve:

  • Portable Appliance Testing (PAT) - PAT testing can be a great source of income for professional electricians. This qualification (equivalent to the City & Guilds 2377 certificate) will equip you with the necessary skills to do it.

  • Fundamental Inspection & Testing - This qualification is equivalent to the City & Guilds 2392 certificate and serves as a great introduction to electrical inspection and testing.

  • Periodic Inspection & Testing - Following on from the above, this is a more advanced inspection and testing qualification that (as per City & Guilds 2395) focuses on developing these skills and equipping you with the knowledge you'll need to carry out professional periodic work.
  • Design & Verification - Equivalent to the City & Guilds 2396 qualification, this is among the very highest electrician qualifications in the industry. It covers the design of electrical systems and enables you to design/specify systems for other electricians to install.

 

Click here to browse our full range of electrical courses, or feel free to contact us if you have any questions about the assorted electrician qualifications Access Training can help you to obtain.

Judge's gavel

It's widely known that gas engineers in the UK are legally required to join the Gas Safe Register before working on gas appliances. But do you know what the punishment is for carrying out gas work when you're not Gas Safe registered?

A Mr Stevens of Milton Keynes recently found out. The director of Master Plumbing Contractors Limited recently appeared before Aylesbury Crown Court, where he was sentenced to 300 hours of community service and ordered to pay costs of £15,000.

This sentence was handed down because Mr Stevens was working illegally when he installed a gas boiler (later found to have defects) at a property in Milton Keynes. The court heard that Mr Stevens had...

  • Professed to be Gas Safe registered
  • Worn a T-shirt bearing the Gas Safe logo
  • Displayed the Gas Safe logo on his company van

...but an investigation by the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) found that, despite all appearances, Mr Stevens actually was not on the Gas Safe Register at the time the work was carried out.

Following the outcome of this hearing, HSE inspector Andrew McGill issued a statement warning "rogue gas fitters" that gas work is "difficult, specialised and potentially very dangerous", and that it should only be undertaken by "trained and competent engineers who are registered with Gas Safe".

How do you get on the Gas Safe Register?

In order to join the Gas Safe Register and avoid the penalties for illegal gas work, you will first need to pass your ACS assessment - and you won't be able to do that until you've learned the essential skills, theory and safety procedures that every professional gas engineer must know.

If you're thinking of joining the trade and making a living from gas work, we offer a selection of comprehensive gas courses here at Access Training Academies. You'll learn in a fully-equipped training centre under the supervision of an experienced gas engineer, and we'll help you to progress smoothly and quickly from learning the basics to preparing for your ACS assessment. We can also help with the reassessments that you'll have to complete every few years in order to stay on the Gas Safe Register.

Our Gas Courses >   Speak to a Course Advisor >

READ MORE: How to Become Gas Safe Registered

Become an electrician

If you're looking for a rewarding new career, then you may want to think about becoming an electrician. Gaining your electrical qualifications and starting down this path can be challenging, but the rewards of an electrician career are well worth it.

 

Why become an electrician?

  • Electricians commonly make upwards of £30,000 per year (according to totaljobs.com)

  • You'll have the opportunity to be your own boss and choose your hours

  • Qualified electricians are in very high demand right now - many UK firms have reported difficulties recruiting electricians

In addition to the above perks, electricians also enjoy a more active working day, making their way from one job to the next and engaging in practical, hands-on labour instead of sitting at a desk all week.

All of these are great reasons to become an electrician - but how exactly do you do it? Well, as with any trade, there are a number of industry-recognised qualifications associated with electrical work, and you'll obviously need to get qualified before you can start work; after all, electricity is very dangerous if you don't know what you're doing, and it's illegal for untrained personnel to operate on live electrical installations.

 

What qualifications do I need to be an electrician?

In order to start your electrician career, you will first need to earn an industry-recognised Level 3 electrical qualification, such as:

  • Level 3 Award in the In-Service Inspections and Testing of Electrical Equipment (PAT)

  • Level 3 Award in the Building Regulations for Electrical Installations in Dwellings

  • Level 3 Award in the Initial Verification and Certification of Electrical Installations

These qualifications each cover different aspects of an electrician's career, so you may find it worthwhile to complete a package course (e.g. our own Professional Electrical Course, which includes a number of Level 3 electrical qualifications) in order to give the best possible foundation for a varied, lucrative career. Simply click below to learn more!

Professional Electrical Course >

 

Electrician career

How long does it take to get qualified?

A lot of budding electricians get qualified over a number of years via an apprenticeship or NVQ diploma course, with a Level 3 qualification awarded upon completion. Other people obtain Level 1 and/or Level 2 qualifications before seeking trainee positions.

These aren't the only options, however. Fast-track electrical courses - which allow candidates to achieve Level 3 qualifications within a very short time frame - have become increasingly popular in recent years. This is an option you may wish to consider if you're looking to start your electrician career ASAP.

Fast-track courses vary in duration, but dedicated students can complete their training and become qualified electricians in a matter of months.

 

What happens once you're qualified?

Once you have completed your electrical training and earned the necessary qualification(s), you can seek employment with a firm, or you can start your own business and be your own boss.

Many newly-qualified electricians choose the latter option, and it's not hard to see why: self-employed electricians can work as few or as many hours as they please, and their earnings aren't limited to their contracted salary.

However, if you would prefer to be employed by someone else, that's a great choice too, and with electricians extremely in-demand at the moment, you should have no trouble finding a job.

 

How can I start my electrician career?

If you're serious about becoming an electrician, we offer a range of accredited electrical courses here at Access Training Academies.

Our electrician training packages include a number of industry-recognised qualifications, including some of the Level 3 electrical qualifications mentioned earlier.

In addition to offering flexible training programmes in fully-equipped electrical training centres, we also provide ongoing career support for 3 years after you enrol with us. Our expert advice and industry connections will help to get your electrician career off to the best possible start!

View Our Electrical Courses >

 

2020 UPDATE: In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, we now offer Live Online Learning - this means that you can start learning the fundamentals of electrical work at home!

Our virtual classroom sessions allow you to interact and ask questions as usual, plus you can rewatch each tutorial as many times as you wish. Once you've completed your electrical theory training, you will attend one of our training centres, where we'll teach you how to put that knowledge into practice. Contact Access Training now to learn more about our e-learning courses.

 

Wondering what it's like to train with us? Here's a review from one of our electricians in training:

If you need advice on any of our electrical training courses, or would just like to speak to one of our expert advisors about any of the courses we offer, don’t hesitate to get in touch. Call us on 0800 345 7492 or email info@accesstraininguk.co.uk to discuss your electrician career options.

Train for a new career

Leaving your comfort zone behind and training for a new career can a very intimidating prospect, but if you've grown weary of your current role, it may be the best decision you ever make.

Here at Access Training, we specialise in career change courses for people who wish to learn a trade (such as plumbing or plastering) and make a living out of it. Our courses are designed for individuals with absolutely no experience or knowledge of their chosen trade, so even if you've never so much as changed a fuse or unblocked a sink, you can become a fully-qualified electrician or plumber within a surprisingly short period of time.

Here's a quick overview of what to expect when you train for a new career with Access Training Academies:

 

Industry-recognised qualifications

The key to starting a successful new career in any trade is gaining the qualifications that will mark you out as a qualified member of that particular field. Gas engineers, for instance, must undergo an ACS assessment and join the Gas Safe Register before they can start earning money.

The new career courses we deliver here at Access Training are specifically structured to get you the qualifications you'll need to succeed in your new role. Instead of researching which certificates and accreditations you need to seek out, you can simply pick a course package - like, for instance, our Professional Gas Engineer Course - and begin your training, secure in the knowledge that we've covered all the essentials.

 

Help from experienced tutors

All of our course leaders are qualified tradespeople with years of commercial experience in their respective fields. This means that they are perfectly placed to provide all the assistance and instruction you could possibly require.

Furthermore, we aim to keep our class sizes as small as possible, so you can rest assured that you'll have plenty of opportunities to talk things out with your tutor as you progress through your chosen training course.

 

Intensive training programmes

Our career change courses are designed to get you qualified as quickly as possible. Instead of signing up for an apprenticeship and waiting several years to become a fully-fledged tradesperson, you can get trained up in a matter of months and start your exciting new career right away. This is a great choice if you can't afford to take a loss of income as you transition from one career path to another.

 

Learn from the ground up

As mentioned above, our courses cover everything a professional tradesperson needs to know. Don't worry if you don't know the first thing about electricity - we'll start from the absolute basics and work up from there, ensuring that you get plenty of support as you learn.

Our new career courses comprise a finely-tuned combination of theory and practical work. We'll make sure you know everything you need to know about your new trade, but we'll also ensure that you leave with plenty of hands-on experience so that you're completely confident when you show up for that first paid job.

Ready to train for a new career? To find out more about our career change courses, contact Access Training today or choose from the options listed below.

 

New Career Training Courses:

Gas courses

Gas engineers are among the most in-demand tradespeople of all, and if you're willing to put in the work necessary to get certified and join the Gas Safe Register, you'll be able to do all sorts of jobs that less-qualified workers are unable to tackle.

With that in mind, it's easy to see why gas courses are such a popular choice amongst people who are looking to change careers. But is a gas course the right choice for you? And are gas training programmes really worth the price tag?

 

Benefits of training to be a gas engineer

  1. Take advantage of the skills shortage. The UK is currently experiencing a shortage of skilled tradespeople, and our forthcoming departure from the European Union is expected to exacerbate the situation still further. However, this is actually very good news for you if you're considering quitting your current job and learning a trade instead - as a newly-qualified gas engineer, you should have no shortage of lucrative jobs to take on.

  2. Work on a wide range of appliances. Gas engineers don't just fix boilers. Once you're on the Gas Safe Register, you'll potentially be called upon to fix everything from ovens to hobs to fireplaces. If you're also qualified as a plumber (gas and plumbing qualifications often go hand-in-hand), you can also add sinks, showers, toilets and bathtubs to that list. This should mean that your days are both busy and enjoyably varied.

  3. Make lots of money! According to totaljobs.com, the average salary for a gas engineer in the UK is in excess of £32,000. That's a very appealing pay packet indeed, especially when the work itself is so rewarding and enjoyable.

Of course, it does cost money (usually several thousand pounds, also this can vary) to train as a gas engineer, but as we think you'll agree, the pros above are well worth that initial expense.

 

Gas courses from Access Training

If you're ready to begin your new career path, you'll be pleased to learn that we offer a comprehensive range of gas engineer training courses here at Access Training Academies. Our training packages are affordable and great value for money; furthermore, we offer flexible payment plans and finance options across all of our courses.

2020 UPDATE: We are pleased to announce that, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are now offering live online training sessions. This means that you can begin your gas training at home - join our virtual classroom, put your questions to our expert tutors, and learn the key theory that all gas engineers must know. The practical component of your gas course will take place at our fully-equipped training centre, where you'll be able to put your knowledge into practice and get plenty of hands-on experience.

Click the links below to find out more about each training course:

No matter what trade you'd like to learn, please contact Access Training today to find out how we can help you to achieve your career ambitions!

Quick Career Change

So you're sick of your current job and you want to make a change as soon as possible. You could simply apply for a role elsewhere, of course, but what if it's not your present employer or workplace that you have a problem with? What if you're looking to switch to a different line of work entirely?

If that's the case, you'll often have to retrain and you can have the opportunity to do so by looking into our intensive trade courses. As we explained in our last blog post, What Are the Best Careers to Retrain For?, learning a new skill and becoming a professional tradesperson is a great career change option, but is it the right choice when you're specifically looking to make a QUICK career change? In other words...

Is it possible to become a qualified tradesperson in a short space of time?

The 'traditional' training route for plumbers, electricians and other tradespeople is unfortunately rather time-consuming. An apprenticeship takes several years to complete, meaning that you'll be stuck at the training stage for quite a while before starting your new career proper.

Fortunately, there are faster ways to get qualified. A good intensive / fast-track training course will cover everything you need to know (including all relevant theory knowledge as well as the practical skills you'll be using on the job) in a matter of months rather than years, making this a far better option when time is of the essence.

Of course, successfully completing a fast-track trade course requires a lot of hard work, but your effort will pay off in a number of different ways:

  • You'll be able to start your new career sooner

  • You'll be learning your new trade instead of making tea for your boss (as can unfortunately be the case for apprentices)

  • You'll have the opportunity to grow your skill set rapidly by taking on additional training courses if you wish

Intensive training courses from Access Training

If you're looking to get trained up and change careers ASAP, Access Training's fast-track courses are ideal for you. Contact us now to discuss your options, or click one of the following links to find out more:

Photo courtesy of pexels.com

Retraining for a new career

If your current job has become frustrating, uninspiring, or just plain dull, then it may be time to consider retraining for a new career. You can retrain at 20, 30, 40 and beyond - regardless of your age, it's never too late to change your path!

While lucrative careers that require no qualifications or prior training do exist, such opportunities are relatively few and far between, so it's generally a better bet to undertake some form of retraining before embarking on a new career path. The best careers to retrain for can take many forms: some people choose to go back to university, or even to a sixth form college to retake their A-levels. Others enrol on apprenticeships or vocational courses.

Of course, the best retraining route for you depends very heavily on what kind of career you're looking to pursue. Here are some of the questions you should be asking...

 

What career should I retrain for?

Typing 'best careers to retrain for' into Google produces all sorts of different answers to this question. One website tells you to become a chef; another recommends logistics, firefighting and air traffic control. There doesn't seem to be any real consensus as to what the best career path is, and while that's perfectly understandable - everybody is different, and one person's dream job is another person's nightmare - we'd like to make the case today for learning a trade and retraining as a tradesperson.

There are countless opportunities for qualified tradespeople in the UK right now. The government made house building a key focus of their latest budget, and if their targets are to be met, the country will need a lot more workers who are capable of building new properties and providing them with water and electricity. And that need is set to become even greater over the coming years - according to the Telegraph, the UK's construction industry workforce will decrease by 20 to 25% in the next decade. New, skilled workers are needed to fill that gap, so if you're weighing up prospective career options, getting into the trade could well be a very good retraining choice indeed.

 

Retraining options for budding tradespeople

The government's stated goal is to build 300,000 homes a year. Lots of different skills are required to construct a habitable modern home; bricklayers and carpenters will be in very high demand, of course, but so will the following people:

 

Electricians

Homes need electricity, and only a qualified electrical engineer can legally perform electrical installations. Why not retrain as an electrician with the help of Access Training?

Electrical training courses >

 

Plumbers

Homes also need water, and there are many jobs for a plumber to do within a house building project. Sinks, taps, baths, toilets, showers, dishwashers...the list goes on. We offer a variety of plumbing courses if you'd like to retrain as a plumber.

Plumbing courses >

 

Gas Engineers

Many plumbers choose to also train as gas engineers and join the Gas Safe Register, as this enables them to carry out a wider variety of tasks (e.g. boiler installation). This is a rewarding and challenging profession for people looking to retrain.

Gas training courses >

 

Kitchen Fitters

Professional kitchen fitters are required to have a strong grasp of numerous specialist skills, from measuring and marking up to cutting worktops and installing cooker circuits. Retraining for a career in kitchen fitting will provide you with lots of lucrative work, and might even come in handy at home!

Kitchen fitting courses >

 

Want to find out more about our best retraining options? If you're ready to start retraining for your dream career, please contact Access Training Academies today.

how long to become a gas engineer

The UK's plumbing and heating industry has been struggling with a serious skills shortage for some time now. Plumbers and gas engineers are in exceedingly high demand; many have found themselves forced to turn down jobs because there's simply no room in their tightly-packed schedules.

So the country needs more gas engineers, and it needs them now. The problem is that it's impossible to become a Gas Safe engineer overnight - completing college courses takes several years, and the same goes for apprenticeships. However, our fast-track courses allow you to become qualified in a matter of months.

 

What's the fastest way to become a gas engineer?

There are plenty of opportunities for Gas Safe engineers in Britain right now, but it takes a long time to get qualified via the 'traditional' training routes like apprenticeships and college courses. It can take at least six months - and often far longer - to become a gas engineer this way.

Fortunately for budding gas engineers and the homeowners who rely on their services, apprenticeships are no longer the only way to become a qualified heating engineer. Over the last few years, intensive gas training courses have soared in popularity throughout the UK, with an increasing number of career changers opting for the fast-track route and attaining Gas Safe status in a matter of a few months.

Some programmes even allow students the flexibility to learn part time so as to accommodate other commitments. This is great news for would-be tradespeople who need to stay in work and/or support a family while completing their Gas Safe training.

Gas Engineer Training Courses >

 

How to become a Gas Safe engineer

Here's a quick step-by-step overview of how to become a gas engineer:

  1. Your gas training journey begins in the classroom, where you will learn how gas appliances work and familiarise yourself with important gas safety legislation.

  2. Next, you will move on to the practical portion of your gas training course, mastering the skills that you'll use every day once you're a qualified gas engineer.

  3. Your Gas Safe course will culminate in an initial ACS assessment. At the very least, you will need to pass a CCN1 (Core Gas Safety) assessment, but you can choose to add further qualifications - such as CKR1 for gas cookers or CENWAT1 for central heating boilers - if you would like to work on a wider range of gas appliances.

  4. Once you have passed your initial ACS assessment, you will be eligible to join the Gas Safe Register (previously CORGI). At that point, you can officially call yourself a Gas Safe engineer - congratulations!

  5. In order to remain on the Gas Safe Register, you must renew your qualifications periodically. This involves attending an ACS reassessment.

 

Become a gas engineer with our intensive training courses

As an example, let's look at the Professional Gas Engineer Course that we offer here at Access Training. This is a flexible gas training course that's open to everyone - no prior heating or plumbing experience is required to enrol.

This intensive course is specifically designed to earn you the qualifications needed to become a Gas Safe engineer, getting you ready for work within the shortest possible timeframe. All the basics are covered (including gas safety legislation and standards), and the hands-on training programme ensures that students are able to do everything that's expected of a gas engineer, such as pipework, tightness tests, and repairing a variety of gas appliances.

Our Professional Gas Engineer course leads to the ACS gas assessment, which tests students on everything they've learned. If you pass this assessment, you will receive the ACS Certificate - this enables you to join the Gas Safe Register, a legal requirement for gas engineers in the UK.

 

Start learning online! In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we now offer live online learning. This means that you can commence your Gas Safe training online without leaving the house. In our virtual classroom sessions, you will learn the fundamental theory that every gas engineer needs to master - not only will you be able to ask questions and interact with your tutor as normal, you will also be able to rewatch each class for revision purposes. Contact Access Training Academies to find out more.

 

We also offer a Premier Gas Engineer Course, which includes two electrical qualifications. Completion of this course allows you to conduct electrical as well as gas work, which is a useful advantage for a professional gas engineer to have.

Browse Our Gas Engineer Courses >

For more information on how to become a gas engineer, our fast-track gas courses, the qualifications we offer, or how long it will take to complete your training and become a Gas Safe engineer, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the Access Training team.

Get in touch to learn more about our training courses!

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