UK job market

Britain's job market has had a turbulent time over the last decade, enduring the lows of a recession to bounce back to record highs in 2019.

However, according to UK recruitment giant, REED, Britain could be in store for another hefty setback in the near future – one that could negatively affect employment nationwide.

 

Alarming Job Statistics

REED chairman and company namesake, James Reed, recently expressed his fears of another impending recession on the horizon, following what he calls “the largest fall in jobs since 2010”.

According to Mr Reed, company statistics have seen alarming trends in hospitality and education, where both sectors have seen declines of 24% and 10% respectively.

The Mail on Sunday went on to confirm that the site saw job vacancies drop by 2.3% in the second quarter. While this may not seem much, that figures actually equates to 16,467 job listings.

This is by no means an indictment on REED – they are still Britain’s most popular recruitment site online. As such, this should very much come as worrying news for those heading into the job market or currently in unemployment.

 

Brexit Wounds

While these trends are a likely by-product of the uncertainty surrounding Brexit and the UK’s immediate future, there are ways to safeguard your job security and employability.

Despite the fall in job listings and notable hits in a number of industries, James Reed also noted that there was an increase in demand for skilled workers. Meanwhile, the REED site also saw a growth in temporary jobs.

For contractors and those in the trade, such news may come as an encouraging sign, particularly for those that are self-employed.

 

Skills to Pay the Bills

While the prospect of a potential recession on the horizon is not good news for anyone, there is a glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel for those looking to learn a trade.

Tradespeople trained in a specific skill – such as electricians, gas fitters and plumbers – will be far more protected in the event of a downturn in the jobs market. The reason for this is that these services are vital for maintaining public utilities.

In fact, the aforementioned jobs in particular are often found in lists of so-called “recession-proof” jobs. While that term is naturally to be taken with a pinch of salt, these jobs are undoubtedly more secure than those within unstable industries, like hospitality.

 

Access Training Courses

If you are interested in learning a trade or switching career paths, now is the perfect time to consider making the jump. Why not take a course with Access Training UK and safeguard your employment future today?

Click the links below to find out more about our utility-related courses and protect your financial future today:

Electrical Courses

Gas Courses

Plumbing Courses

 

For more information on courses with Access Training UK, why not get in touch today? Call now on 0800 345 7492 or drop us an email using the link below.

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Full story: Support for Housebuilding should be chancellor's priority says CBI

It was roughly three years ago when the Government announced there was a considerable sum of money that was to be used for social housing building programmes. At the time of the announcement I was uplifted to think that the prospect could bring about an end to the recession. And being a country that isn't known for production, the only way we can produce a financial economy that breaks a recession is by a large scale house building programme.

With all the products used to build homes and all the new products that go into them, the wages earned by the construction workers goes back into the economy. Throughout my career on the tools, I was fortunate to go through two bad recessions - one in the late 80s and then another in the 90s, both of which I was constantly working within the M25 area doing new build work. I personally feel that, and the CBI agree, our most instant way to relieve this recession is to undertake a 50,000 new build affordable home project. If the Government had started their own social housing programme back then, things wouldn't have turned out the way they are today.

- Mark Lewis