In a previous news entry we discussed the confusion or lack of general awareness centring on the new Gas Safe Register, and the potential gas safety problems which can occur when you employ tradesmen who are not properly registered. In recent months, it has come to light that even more serious electrical problems are looming…

Back in January 2005, the government introduced new legislation regulating electrical installation work carried out in houses and gardens. This came after a number of electrical injuries (750) and deaths (10), which occurred as a direct result of poor electrical wiring. There existed a common misconception that electrical work could be carried out, without the relevant electrical training or expertise, within the home. These yearly figures are disturbing enough; however, add these to the 2,336 house fires caused by incorrect electrical installation and the picture painted becomes far more menacing.

There is a distinct lack of general awareness amongst the public, and disturbingly amongst trades people themselves. Part P of the building regulations explains why the dangers of electrical shocks from faulty electrical work are so widespread. As an example, in 2008, the Electrical Safety Council reported that a serious incident occurred when a woman was electrocuted following the redecoration of a room in her house. The woman received a fatal electrical shock when her decorator, who was not compliant with Part P of the regulations, replaced some electrical sockets with those of a different style. The woman was electrocuted when she picked up a metal lamp which had become live, whilst touching another lamp that was earthed. In this instance, despite the work not complying with Part P, the Crown Prosecution Service decided that there were no grounds to prosecute the decorator; however, the message is stark: you must comply with Part P and notify Building Control of your local authority when you carry out repairs, replacements, maintenance work or add extra power or lighting points to existing circuits. They will then send an inspector to assess the work and provide you with a certificate to confirm the work fully complies.

It is still possible to be registered to carry out electrical work without the need to inform Building Control, and still be compliant with Part P. This can be achieved by becoming a member of a competent person scheme, such as the NICEIC. A short electrical training course with us here at Access Training will teach you everything you need to know.  We can also put you in touch with the NICEIC to start the registration process as a domestic electrician. This will give kitchen fitters, carpenters, decorators, plumbers, plasterers, general builders and even keen DIYers the training and competence they need.

To find out more about the comprehensive Part P electrical courses we offer here at Access, call us today on 0800 345 7492. We can have you registered with the NCIEC in no time as a fully signed up member of the Competent Person Scheme.

Get in touch to learn more about our training courses!

First Name *
Surname *
Telephone Number *
E-mail address *
Ask A Question *
 
Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character
Enter Letters (No Spaces) *