Whoever said “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks” must have had one very lazy, disobedient dog. After all, it’s also been said that “life begins at 40” – so why not give your career a new lease of life by retraining with us?

Becoming an electrician at 40 years old may seem like a drastic change of pace but it can be a welcome transition for anyone looking to shake up their professional life or simply enhance their existing skillset.

 

becoming an electrician at 40

 

Why become an electrician at 40?

The number of 40+ workers seeking a new career path has seen a steady increase in recent years and trade work has emerged as a top choice for those brave enough to change course. But why?

Until something drastic happens in the world of technology, most British’s homes are going to need a steady supply of gas and electric, making energy-related trades a viable path for anyone looking to shake up their work life.

What’s more, the autonomy that comes with it could be a real breath of fresh air. Having an energy trade under your belt not only opens up doors to established umbrella brands like the “Big Six” – British Gas, EDF, E.ON, Npower, Scottish Power and SSE – it also creates clear and realistic avenues to self-employment, allowing you to work for yourself on your own terms.

 

How to become an electrician at 40

There can be a whole laundry list of reasons why a person may want to become an electrician at 40: from a voluntary career change to a catalytic reaction to redundancy. Whatever your reason may be, the path to a new horizon starts with a single step in the right direction.

If you’re reading this blog – congratulations! That first step starts here – so kudos for being proactive… now what?

Well, the road to qualification has three primary stops along the way:

 

Training

Typically achieved on a full or part-time basis, training will provide you with the essential knowledge and expertise on how to do the job efficiently, safely and professionally.

 

Work Experience

Like any job, first-hand work experience is a vital component in transferring theory into a practical, real-world environment.

 

Assessment

Once you’re equipped with the theoretical knowledge and practical experience, a final assessment will determine if you’re ready to make it in the wide world of the electrical trade.

 

While the specifics of each course will vary depending on the chosen course – be it essential, professional, premier, etc. – these three steps provide a basic blueprint of what to expect when you enter a course.

After you’ve completed each stage on this electrifying journey, you’ll reach your final destination as a fully-qualified electrician!

 

becoming an electrician at 40 

 

Benefits of retraining at 40

While it may seem like a daunting task, becoming an electrician at 40 is far from impossible. In fact, it can be a hugely exciting journey for anyone brave enough to make the leap.

Don’t let Father Time put you off either – you’re never too old to learn something new. What’ more, mature students can have the hot hand over their younger counterparts in a variety of ways.

Mature students typically have a firm career path in mind when they re-enter education and a clear idea of where they want to go once qualified. Time away from the educational highways and by-ways can also provide career clarity and motivation to truly knuckle down.

For mature students, the decision to retrain is a conscious one made individually, unlike many students who can be easily swayed and led astray by friends and family influence. This can also translate into a more focused approach to learning, making the temptation to miss a session or neglect course revision seem a lot less attractive.

Additionally, life experience can be a real asset in the classroom, adding another dimension to the approach to learning. The self-discipline needed to succeed in a course of learning can be easily transferred from personal and professional life experience, while the same can be said for organisation and prioritising.

 

Benefits of becoming an electrician at 40

From a professional standpoint, there are also further benefits to being 40+. As a general rule of employment, employers typically like mature graduates of any ilk as they come ready-made with many key attributes attached. These employer-friendly specs include two important things: experience and qualifications.

While a younger newly-qualified electrician may have youthful exuberance on their side, they can also lack experience in the working world and can also at times still be relatively immature from a professional standpoint.

What’s more, customers are also said to feel most comfortable with a tradesperson over 40. A consumer study by Watersafe showed that customers believed the most trusted age of a tradesperson to be 41. In fact, the most trusted age bracket was 36 to 49, achieving a whopping 50% of the overall vote.

 

Make the jump

With retirement age creeping further and further out of reach with what seems like eternal regularity, staying put in a job you hate is as good as a life sentence. In fact, the feeling of Sunday night dread and Monday morning misery can be a prison in itself.

A career change can be a real shot in the arm and not only revitalise your career but also change the way you live your life. As the old saying goes, “if you love your job, you’ll never work a day in your life”. Love your job and live your life with a career change that lights a spark inside you.

 

What are you waiting for? Put the power back in your hands with an electrician course today! For more information on electrician courses, click the button below and explore a new career now.

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We are regularly asked various questions regarding the two City & Guilds Inspection and Testing Courses, as there seems to be some confusion as to exactly what each course entails. Access Training is here to clear this up:

  • I want to inspect & test but which qualification do I need?
  • What’s the difference between the City & Guilds 2391-10 and the City & Guilds 2392-10?
  • I have some basic experience of inspection and testing but I want to be able to issue Landlord Certificates, so which qualification is best for me?
  • Do I have enough experience to undertake the inspection and testing qualifications?
  • What does the 2392-10 qualification qualify me to do?

By way of general advice, we will now endeavour to outline these two important City & Guilds qualifications, which are appropriate for electricians, inspectors and other persons requiring training and qualifications in inspection and testing.

The two City & Guilds qualifications relating to electrical installations are:

The 2392-10 City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate in Fundamental Inspection, Testing and Initial Verification.

The 2391-10 City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate in Inspection, Testing and Certification of Electrical Installations.

Firstly you will notice the words highlighted in bold above; these show the subtle differences in the courses which are often missed. What becomes immediately clear is that one of the courses directly leads to the other; let’s elaborate on that point further:

The first qualification, the 2392-10, is a level 2 electrical qualification, which was developed to meet the needs of the electrical industry and for electrical training centres as a means of introducing students to the basics. It is also the perfect course to serve electricians, giving them the very best possible chance when naturally progressing onto the 2391-10. This is the qualification, which after completion allows you to ‘certify electrical installations’. The 2392-10 alone does not certify you to do this.

However, the main reason for this course being introduced was that the pass rate for the 2391 full inspection and testing examination was only around 40%, as many found the leap in understanding to be too great. Directly compare this to Access Training’s students pass rate of 72% for the 2391-10, if they have previously attended the 2392-10.

This proves that by passing the Fundamentals of Inspection and Testing in the first instance, your chances of achieving the lucrative 2391 Inspection and Testing qualification are nearly doubled!

In summary, the 2392-10 is suitable for those with limited experience or those with only basic prior knowledge of electrical principles (as taught on Access Training’s Professional Electrical Course and Advanced Electrical Course), and is a purpose designed lead-in to the full City and Guilds 2391-10 Inspection and Testing, giving you a much greater chance of successfully achieving the qualification.

The second qualification is the full name for City & Guilds 2391-10 Inspection & Testing qualification, which is the one you ultimately want to achieve. It is a more advanced electrical course and is a qualification which allows you to test and inspect domestic, commercial and industrial electrical installations – in layman’s terms, issuing Landlord Certificates.

As City & Guilds states, it is a Level 3 electrical course, and therefore has a relatively high degree of difficulty. Some practicing electricians make a concerted effort to avoid this qualification due to its infamy! Enquire about our course and we’ll explain why these fears can be easily allayed. 

To surmise, our advice is simple: unless you are fully aware of the level of expertise involved with achieving the 2391-10 Inspection & Testing qualification, or have previous extensive experience of inspection & testing practices, then you should achieve the 2392-10 Fundamentals of Inspection & Testing first. Although the 2392-10 doesn’t allow you to carry out any specific work as such, it dramatically increases your chances of passing the 2391-10, leading to a far better understanding of the inspection and testing process.

For specific information on the courses discussed in this article, click on the links below or call Access Training now on 0800 345 7492.

The 2392-10 City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate in Fundamental Inspection, Testing and Initial Verification.

The 2391-10 City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate in Inspection, Testing and Certification of Electrical Installations.

If you are reading this post you are doubtless aware of the continuing debate surrounding the future of Part P and whether or not it is sufficient to meet the demands of the electrical industry, and more importantly, of the general public.

Electricians across the spectrum seem to be divided about its effectiveness, unable to agree as to whether the current electrical building regulations go far enough, or simply create a vacuum within the industry. Since the coalition government took power the regulations have been caught up in the political undercurrents which have been circulating a number of government departments.

The debate will certainly go on, but the merits of Part P of the building regulations received a ringing endorsement last month from comments made by Phil Buckle, Director General of Electrical Safety Council, who said, “I certainly agree Part P has not been seen as the electrician’s friend, but it has certainly brought about benefits for the consumer.

“As a contributing factor towards improved safety, the Council will continue to lobby Westminster for its retention. We have also made our support for Part P clear at the party conferences held in the autumn of 2010. We have already sent comments to the Minister, Andrew Stunell, as part of an initial review of the building regulations. Our entire raison d’être [at the Electrical Safety Council] is to ensure the safety of all users of electricity. It would not be acceptable to the ESC if we were to allow a vacuum whereby untrained individuals could undertake electrical work without checks – this would surely be the case if Part P were scrapped.”

There seems little doubt that with the might of the Electrical Safety Council behind it, and in conjunction with associated bodies such as the NICEIC, Part P will remain in place, continuing to protect the general public from the dangers of unchecked electrical work in domestic properties.

If you’re an electrician or tradesperson undertaking electrical work in a domestic environment, it is essential to ensure your conformation with Part P of the building regulations. We would also highly recommend joining a Competent Person Scheme such as the NICEIC.

If you would like to learn more about the Part P electrical courses offered by Access Training, or you’d like to know more about the NICEIC, call us today on 0800 345 7492.

In a previous news entry we discussed the confusion or lack of general awareness centring on the new Gas Safe Register, and the potential gas safety problems which can occur when you employ tradesmen who are not properly registered. In recent months, it has come to light that even more serious electrical problems are looming…

Back in January 2005, the government introduced new legislation regulating electrical installation work carried out in houses and gardens. This came after a number of electrical injuries (750) and deaths (10), which occurred as a direct result of poor electrical wiring. There existed a common misconception that electrical work could be carried out, without the relevant electrical training or expertise, within the home. These yearly figures are disturbing enough; however, add these to the 2,336 house fires caused by incorrect electrical installation and the picture painted becomes far more menacing.

There is a distinct lack of general awareness amongst the public, and disturbingly amongst trades people themselves. Part P of the building regulations explains why the dangers of electrical shocks from faulty electrical work are so widespread. As an example, in 2008, the Electrical Safety Council reported that a serious incident occurred when a woman was electrocuted following the redecoration of a room in her house. The woman received a fatal electrical shock when her decorator, who was not compliant with Part P of the regulations, replaced some electrical sockets with those of a different style. The woman was electrocuted when she picked up a metal lamp which had become live, whilst touching another lamp that was earthed. In this instance, despite the work not complying with Part P, the Crown Prosecution Service decided that there were no grounds to prosecute the decorator; however, the message is stark: you must comply with Part P and notify Building Control of your local authority when you carry out repairs, replacements, maintenance work or add extra power or lighting points to existing circuits. They will then send an inspector to assess the work and provide you with a certificate to confirm the work fully complies.

It is still possible to be registered to carry out electrical work without the need to inform Building Control, and still be compliant with Part P. This can be achieved by becoming a member of a competent person scheme, such as the NICEIC. A short electrical training course with us here at Access Training will teach you everything you need to know.  We can also put you in touch with the NICEIC to start the registration process as a domestic electrician. This will give kitchen fitters, carpenters, decorators, plumbers, plasterers, general builders and even keen DIYers the training and competence they need.

To find out more about the comprehensive Part P electrical courses we offer here at Access, call us today on 0800 345 7492. We can have you registered with the NCIEC in no time as a fully signed up member of the Competent Person Scheme.

Reading the various reports coming from Government sources has led many to conclude that as of the end of 2010, ‘no one will be able to become an electrician unless they are on an apprenticeship’. Here at Access Training we know this is simply not the case. Consider the following scenario... One particular individual, let's call him Dave, is looking for a change in career and would really like to become an electrician. He currently works in a call centre for a popular and well advertised gas company answering calls each and every day.  The pay is poor and the hours are long.  He has a friend who recently completed an intense course and is now a successful plumber. Up until now, his present job has been sufficient. He has been enjoying life and glad of the regular income which supports this. At the age of 30, Dave meets a girl and decides / hopes she is the one. They move in together.  They now have two incomes, and although small the rent is covered, bills are paid and they enjoy regular nights out. 

Dave then reaches his 31st birthday; he decides that now is the time and pops the question. She accepts, he breaths a huge sigh of relief, and they start thinking about buying a house.  Dave then discovers he is due to be a father, and after some thought realises his income really needs to increase if he is going to be able to provide sufficiently for his family.  He needs a change of career and has always liked the idea of being an electrician. He has done some research and discovered that his earning potential will soar, giving him and his family the lifestyle they crave. He has already discussed working with his plumber friend; he currently has no qualifications and doesn’t know where to get trained.  He pays a visit to a few local colleges and enquires about going on an evening course.  The tutor explains the courses are full and there is a substantial waiting list. He also discovers that even after the completion of such a course he will only be qualified to lower level, not giving him full electrician status, allowing him to get a  job as a ‘mate’ or an ‘improver’. He is also put off by the length of the course which lasts a matter of years; realistically he would much prefer a high intensity course which lasts just months. 

He then sees something in the national press which talks about Adult Apprenticeships and thinks great, this could be my chance. After a little research he realises that finding an employer who is willing to take him on an apprenticeship is virtually impossible. Now he feels completely lost.

Then one day just by chance he spots an advert in the local press from Access Training, a company that specialises in providing training for career changers and offers intensive and focused training which fits around an individual’s job, lifestyle and family commitments. This sounds great. He gives them a call and they explain everything he needs to know about becoming an electrician, allaying all the myths and taking the time to carefully explain, impartially, the facts relating to his prospects in the industry. They explain how the technical know-how and industry recognised qualifications he will receive will act as a carrot-on-a-stick to employers; he could even set out on his own when he is ready.  Within a short period of time he could have all the necessary qualifications to work as a fully qualified and graded electrician, more than trebling his previous income. 

Dave attends the course, becomes fully qualified, and because he’s his own boss he can spend as much time with his family as he likes. His earnings leap towards levels he never thought possible. There is also great benefit to the industry as a whole as the skills shortage is addressed, with the addition of an enthusiastic, motivated and well qualified electrician. Everyone’s a winner! 

This wonderful opportunity exists out there in the labour market today; you just have to know where to look. Yet governing bodies such as Summit Skills would not record this as a success. They are so blinkered that they are only interested in youth apprenticeships and not adult trainees with internationally recognised qualifications accredited from the NICEIC and City & Guilds.

With a massive decrease in apprenticeships offered by companies over the last few years, coupled with the ‘Credit Crunch’, there are more people than ever out of work.  Lots of people want to be electricians, plumbers, gas fitters and trades people but cannot find the necessary training to make progress.  Many mature individuals don’t believe they can become electricians at all as they falsely believe they have ‘missed the boat’ or are ‘too old’. Many adult learners know they want to learn a trade and do something with their hands. But for whatever reason, information on how to get good trade training as an adult is not easy to come by. This is where commercially aware, honest private training providers like Access Training come in. Just take a look at our testimonial section for examples.

So is a career change really a good idea when the information and advice can seem confusing?  Well, yes, in the majority of situations it is.  A career change brings fresh impetus, a new outlook on life and for many people, an opportunity to improve their financial situation.  This is the driving force behind most adult trainees, who, with careful introduction and thoughtful application by training providers like Access Training, can successfully change their lives for the better.

The problem is that for a mature individual, interested in a career change, making the right choice is never easy. However, planned correctly with the help of Access Training, adult students have a great opportunity to get out there and fill the skills gap, in a job which is both enjoyable and financially rewarding.

The conclusion is simple: colleges and apprenticeships are not always the answer; certainly not for a mature individual looking for a career change. Here at Access Training, we are not at all worried about the future of our adult students. We have many success stories across all the trades. Amongst all the doom and gloom in the current economy and the jobs market, the future is very bright for any individuals looking to become electricians, plumbers, gas fitters and more.

Call us today to find out how an intensive electrical training course or plumbing training course will prepare you for the trade, putting in place the industry recognised, expert qualifications you need