Not sure what qualifications you need to work as an electrician? Read our simple guide!

Electrician qualifications

So you want to become an electrician, and you can't wait to enrol on a training course and start learning your new trade.

But there's a problem: you've been looking at the various training courses that are available for budding electricians, and each one seems to result in a different qualification. Now you're wondering which of those certificates and diplomas you actually need - which one will mark you out as a qualified electrician and enable you to turn professional?

Thing is, the world of electrical work is a rich tapestry, comprising lots of different tasks in lots of different places. There are lots of different electrician qualifications because there are lots of different electricians - some specialise in domestic installations, while others work exclusively in commercial/industrial environments. Some make a living from portable appliance testing (PAT), while others spend their days designing and installing complex electrical systems.

Still, there's no need to be baffled by the wide variety of available electrical qualifications. Here's a rough guide to some of the best-known electrician qualifications and what each one actually licenses you to do:

 

Basic Electrician Qualifications

Let's start with the qualifications that are included on our Essential Electrician Course. This a great course for beginners, consisting of three crucial electrical qualifications that just about all electrical engineers are expected to hold:

  • Part P Domestic Installer - The Part P qualification allows you to install, inspect, test and certify a broad range of domestic electrical systems. Along with the 17th Edition certificate (see below), Part P is widely recognised as the essential qualification for new electricians.

  • 17th Edition Wiring Regulations - The phrase '17th Edition' refers to the current Wiring Regulations to which British electricians must adhere. Gaining your 17th Edition certificate demonstrates that you have a good understanding of the Regulations and how to comply with them.

  • Building Regulations for Electrical Installations in Dwellings - The Building Regulations are another important piece of legislation for electricians. Obtaining this qualification demonstrates that you understand the Building Regulations as applicable to electrical installations in homes and dwellings.

 

Going Further: Advanced Electrician Qualifications

Once you have earned the above qualifications, you may wish to work towards obtaining additional qualifications so as to set yourself apart from the competition and broaden the range of jobs you're capable of undertaking. Here are some of the more advanced qualifications that Access Training can help you to achieve:

  • Portable Appliance Testing (PAT) - PAT testing can be a great source of income for professional electricians. This qualification (equivalent to the City & Guilds 2377 certificate) will equip you with the necessary skills to do it.

  • Fundamental Inspection & Testing - This qualification is equivalent to the City & Guilds 2392 certificate and serves as a great introduction to electrical inspection and testing.

  • Periodic Inspection & Testing - Following on from the above, this is a more advanced inspection and testing qualification that (as per City & Guilds 2395) focuses on developing these skills and equipping you with the knowledge you'll need to carry out professional periodic work.
  • Design & Verification - Equivalent to the City & Guilds 2396 qualification, this is among the very highest electrician qualifications in the industry. It covers the design of electrical systems and enables you to design/specify systems for other electricians to install.

 

Click here to browse our full range of electrical courses, or feel free to contact us if you have any questions about the assorted electrician qualifications Access Training can help you to obtain.

Whoever said “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks” must have had one very lazy, disobedient dog. After all, it’s also been said that “life begins at 40” – so why not give your career a new lease of life by retraining with us?

Becoming an electrician at 40 years old may seem like a drastic change of pace but it can be a welcome transition for anyone looking to shake up their professional life or simply enhance their existing skillset.

 

becoming an electrician at 40

 

Why become an electrician at 40?

The number of 40+ workers seeking a new career path has seen a steady increase in recent years and trade work has emerged as a top choice for those brave enough to change course. But why?

Until something drastic happens in the world of technology, most British’s homes are going to need a steady supply of gas and electric, making energy-related trades a viable path for anyone looking to shake up their work life.

What’s more, the autonomy that comes with it could be a real breath of fresh air. Having an energy trade under your belt not only opens up doors to established umbrella brands like the “Big Six” – British Gas, EDF, E.ON, Npower, Scottish Power and SSE – it also creates clear and realistic avenues to self-employment, allowing you to work for yourself on your own terms.

 

How to become an electrician at 40

There can be a whole laundry list of reasons why a person may want to become an electrician at 40: from a voluntary career change to a catalytic reaction to redundancy. Whatever your reason may be, the path to a new horizon starts with a single step in the right direction.

If you’re reading this blog – congratulations! That first step starts here – so kudos for being proactive… now what?

Well, the road to qualification has three primary stops along the way:

 

Training

Typically achieved on a full or part-time basis, training will provide you with the essential knowledge and expertise on how to do the job efficiently, safely and professionally.

 

Work Experience

Like any job, first-hand work experience is a vital component in transferring theory into a practical, real-world environment.

 

Assessment

Once you’re equipped with the theoretical knowledge and practical experience, a final assessment will determine if you’re ready to make it in the wide world of the electrical trade.

 

While the specifics of each course will vary depending on the chosen course – be it essential, professional, premier, etc. – these three steps provide a basic blueprint of what to expect when you enter a course.

After you’ve completed each stage on this electrifying journey, you’ll reach your final destination as a fully-qualified electrician!

 

becoming an electrician at 40 

 

Benefits of retraining at 40

While it may seem like a daunting task, becoming an electrician at 40 is far from impossible. In fact, it can be a hugely exciting journey for anyone brave enough to make the leap.

Don’t let Father Time put you off either – you’re never too old to learn something new. What’ more, mature students can have the hot hand over their younger counterparts in a variety of ways.

Mature students typically have a firm career path in mind when they re-enter education and a clear idea of where they want to go once qualified. Time away from the educational highways and by-ways can also provide career clarity and motivation to truly knuckle down.

For mature students, the decision to retrain is a conscious one made individually, unlike many students who can be easily swayed and led astray by friends and family influence. This can also translate into a more focused approach to learning, making the temptation to miss a session or neglect course revision seem a lot less attractive.

Additionally, life experience can be a real asset in the classroom, adding another dimension to the approach to learning. The self-discipline needed to succeed in a course of learning can be easily transferred from personal and professional life experience, while the same can be said for organisation and prioritising.

 

Benefits of becoming an electrician at 40

From a professional standpoint, there are also further benefits to being 40+. As a general rule of employment, employers typically like mature graduates of any ilk as they come ready-made with many key attributes attached. These employer-friendly specs include two important things: experience and qualifications.

While a younger newly-qualified electrician may have youthful exuberance on their side, they can also lack experience in the working world and can also at times still be relatively immature from a professional standpoint.

What’s more, customers are also said to feel most comfortable with a tradesperson over 40. A consumer study by Watersafe showed that customers believed the most trusted age of a tradesperson to be 41. In fact, the most trusted age bracket was 36 to 49, achieving a whopping 50% of the overall vote.

 

Make the jump

With retirement age creeping further and further out of reach with what seems like eternal regularity, staying put in a job you hate is as good as a life sentence. In fact, the feeling of Sunday night dread and Monday morning misery can be a prison in itself.

A career change can be a real shot in the arm and not only revitalise your career but also change the way you live your life. As the old saying goes, “if you love your job, you’ll never work a day in your life”. Love your job and live your life with a career change that lights a spark inside you.

 

What are you waiting for? Put the power back in your hands with an electrician course today! For more information on electrician courses, click the button below and explore a new career now.

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Qualifications to Be an Electrician
 
At Access Training, we offer a combination of practical experience and theory training to equip our candidates with the knowledge and confidence to succeed in their chosen trade on completion of their course. We also provide them with the opportunity to gain the qualifications recognized in their specific field, so that they can access a suitable employment route and meet the quality standards expected in their industry. So you're thinking about being an electrician but now you're wondering, "what qualifications do I need to be an electrician?".
 
In short, you need the Part P Domestic Installer and 17th Edition Electrical Reg qualifications to begin your career, but each electrical qualification that you gain allows you to work on different jobs. To learn more about what qualifications you need to become a fully qualified electrician, keep reading. 
 
If you're looking to become a qualified electrician, it's highly important that you have the right qualifications in order to meet the industry's strict safety standards.  While you may already have some practical knowledge of working on electrical installations, it remains vital that you validate your abilities and knowledge by gaining the correct qualifications needed to progress in your career. Due to the dangerous nature of the job, as well as the thorough planning and knowledge required to carry out an installation or inspection, it remains vital for electricians to provide proof of their abilities with the appropriate certifications.
 
Here are the qualifications you'll need to establish your career and progress as an electrician:

Minimum Requirements:

  • Part P Domestic Installer - This qualification will allow you to work on electrical installations in the residential sector, in private housing, apartments and so on. Your knowledge will range from the maintenance of lighting, sockets, cooker circuits and consumer units, to more advanced jobs such as full house re-wires.

  • 17th Edition Electrical Regs - An essential companion to your training, this will inform you on the latest wiring regulations, allowing you to work safely and legally.
These qualifications are available on our Essential Electrical Course

Advanced Qualifications:

  • PAT Testing - This qualification equips you with the ability to prevent accidents involving portable, electrical appliances, allowing you to widen the work you are able to undertake on behalf of customers.

  • Fundamental Inspection & Testing - This qualification allows you to inspect and test new circuits on existing installations, while also allowing you to complete new installations.

  • Periodic Inspection & Testing - Designed for experienced electricians, this course will advance your existing knowledge of the inspection and testing of circuits, allowing you to issue safety reports and recommend any additional work.
These qualifications, along with the above, are available on our Professional Electrical Course

Further Progress:

  • Design, Erection and Verification - This covers the theory and design of electrical systems, qualifying you to design electrical systems for others to carry out, the very highest qualification in the electrical trade.
This qualification is available with all of the above, on our Premier Electrical Course
 
You can find our full range of electrical courses, as well as those covering individual units, here. If you are unsure about which of our courses is right for your experience level and ambitions, or if you have any further questions, please feel free to contact a member of our team today!
 

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