Apprentice electrician

An electrical apprenticeship is kind of like a cross between a university course and a full-time job. Apprentices carry out real-life electrical work (under the supervision of an experienced electrician, of course) and get paid for it; but they also spend part of their time in the classroom, studying their new trade and the theory that underpins it. Apprentice electricians typically spend at least 20% of their working hours studying.

Some see the time-honoured apprenticeship route as a rite of passage for budding tradespeople. But an electrical apprenticeship is rarely the most efficient way to get qualified and start your career.

 

The drawbacks of an electrical apprenticeship

An apprenticeship might sound like the best of both worlds, combining the perks of being a student (i.e. self-betterment and opportunities to make new friends) with the benefits of working (i.e. getting paid).

However, apprenticeships have two major downsides:

  • They take years to complete. According to apprenticeships.gov.uk, an apprenticeship can take anywhere from 1 to 6 years. On average, electrical apprenticeships tend to take 3 or 4 years - so if you become an apprentice at the age of 18, there's a good chance you'll turn 21 before you turn professional!

  • Apprentice electricians don't make much money. As an apprentice, you won't be paid anywhere near as much as a fully-fledged pro. According to Indeed, the average salary for an electrician in the UK is £32,415 per year - but an apprentice electrician in the UK makes just £17,467 per year. And as mentioned above, you'll have to wait a few years before you can strike out on your own and start making big money.

 

Why wait years to become a professional electrician?

If you're eager to get qualified and start your electrical career ASAP, there is a speedy alternative to the traditional apprenticeship route.

Here at Access Training Academies, we offer a selection of fast-track electrical courses that are specifically designed to turn novices into fully-qualified electricians as quickly as possible. If you're not thrilled by the prospect of spending the next few years as an apprentice - not making all that much money and working with someone else looking over your shoulder - then our training courses are the perfect alternative.

With our help, you can earn industry-recognised qualifications and achieve 'professional electrician' status in a matter of months. Contact us now to check upcoming course dates, or click the button below to explore your options.

Browse Electrician Courses >

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Man training for a career in electrical engineering

An electrical engineer is someone who designs electrical systems. This can mean anything from assisting with the construction of new homes to planning nationwide energy networks.

As you can probably imagine, this line of work demands a lot of expertise, but if you've got the right qualifications, a career in electrical engineering can be very lucrative indeed. According to payscale.com, the average salary for an electrical engineer in the UK is just over £32,000 per year - and some earn significantly more than that.

Electrical engineers are employed by all sorts of different industries, including:

  • Construction
  • Energy
  • Transport
  • Manufacturing
  • Defence

 

What's the Difference Between an Electrician and an Electrical Engineer?

While 'electrician' and 'electrical engineer' are often used interchangeably, they are - strictly speaking - two different professions. You wouldn't hire an electrical engineer to come and fix your oven, and most jobbing electricians aren't qualified to design large-scale electrical systems.

So what exactly is the difference? Well, this is something of an oversimplification (and there is a certain amount of overlap between the two roles) but broadly speaking, electrical engineers DESIGN the jobs that electricians then CARRY OUT. Think of the electrical engineer as a composer, and the electrician as a concert pianist; one writes the music, the other performs it.

 

How to Become an Electrical Engineer

If you simply want to work as a domestic electrician, you will need the following qualifications (which make up our Essential Electrical Course):

  • Part P Domestic Installer
  • 18th Edition Wiring Regulations
  • Building Regulations for Electrical Installations in Dwellings

If you want to pursue a career in electrical engineering, you will need to know how to design electrical systems. Our Electrical Design Course (which includes a Level 4 design and verification qualification) is recommended for candidates who already have some professional electrical experience under their belts.

Beginners who wish to forge a career in electrical engineering may be interested in our Premier Electrical Course - this comprehensive training package consists of eight different qualifications, covering everything from basic electrical theory all the way through to the design and verification of new installations. No prior knowledge or experience is required to enrol on this course.

View All Electrical Courses >

If you want to become an electrical engineer but you're not sure where to start, please contact Access Training Academies today - our course advisors will start you down the path to your new career.

First thing’s first: anybody can be an electrician, with previous experience or not. In reality, there are only a few important things you need:

  • Theory and practical training preparing you for exams and career
  • Industry recognised qualifications from an accredited awarding body (such as EAL or City & Guilds). 
  • A good work ethic, and a commitment to working in the trade industry.

There are a couple of ways you can gain the training and qualifications to start your career as an electrician. You will need to choose the option that both suits your lifestyle and provides you the best outcome. The two most common are:

  • Apprenticeship. 
    • This takes 2-4 years to complete, typically involving large classes and infrequent training.
    • Poor starting wage.
    • Good experience gained working with professionals for a long period of time.
  • Private training academy 
    • Private academies involve professional tuition in small, focused groups.
    • Amount of time training is the same as apprenticeship, but is condensed to full time or flexible courses so people can work at the same time as training.
    • Courses last from 2 weeks to several months depending on the qualifications being obtained. 
    • Experience needs to be gained quickly and confidently .
    • Great starting wages as qualifications have already been earnt. 

Access Training is a private training company which offers the training courses necessary to become a qualified electrician. It gives you the necessary qualifications, and a leg-up into the electrical industry, providing you with essential experience, skill, and qualifications. Speak to our career support team today to explore all the options available.

Here’s a breakdown of what Access Training can offer anybody starting out on an electrical career, or already experienced in the field, wanting to add a string to your bow. Our courses range between the following:

 

  • Essential - Offering the essential skills and qualifications necessary to becoming a domestic electrician; this course is the base layer requirement for getting you out and working in domestic environments.
  • Professional - For those serious about going far in an electrical career, this course builds on the qualifications on offer; for wider career options, greater skill-set, and more work opportunities, choose this course.
  • Premier - This course will give you everything you could possibly need out of an electrical career; not only will you be a fully qualified and desirable employee, but you will also have the means to work for yourself, and be your own boss.

 

How training works:



With the right mindset, all you need to do is pick the right course for you, sign up, and our tutors will take care of the rest.


Learn your trade. Get qualified. Make it happen.

Essential Tools for Electricians

No matter what trade you happen to work in, you’ll most definitely have a preferred set of tools that you use to get a job done. For electricians, there will be some tools that you will swear by, whilst others may believe they’re not that important. However, there are a number of tools that are absolutely essential for all electricians not only to get a job done safely but effectively and to an excellent standard.

Here we provide a list of some of the essential tools for electricians and what they are used for:

  1. Multimeter

A multimeter measures a number of electrical properties such as voltage, current and resistance. They are available as analogue or digital devices with newer models featuring a host of sophisticated bells and whistles such as thermal imaging cameras and Bluetooth.

 

  1. Voltage Tester

Working as an electrician, it’s crucial to know whether a wire or device is ‘live’ because if you do find yourself working on something that is live, there could well be some dangerous consequences. Used for a fast safety check to ensure there is no voltage in an electrical wire or device, voltage testers absolutely vital. If available, it’s recommended to use a non-contact voltage tester as these can detect electricity without ever touching the wire or outlet.

 

  1. Wire Strippers

With a variety of holes to enable you to work with different size wires, strippers are used to cut and strip insulation from the wire. The handle of the strippers should always be comfortable to hold and easy to grip. Some wire stripper will even be made with cutting teeth so you can trim the wire ends at the same time.

 

  1. Circuit Finder

Circuit directories are not always easy to find in some homes and at times, the service panel is very rarely matched with the complementary breaker. This is where a circuit finder comes in! Simply plug the transmitter into the outlet and detector will figure out where the matching directory is. Circuit finders are also a very handy piece of equipment to trace a circuit.

 

  1. Specialised Screwdrivers and Nut Drivers

Even though they may not seem like trade-specific pieces of equipment and indeed, they’re not, as most people around the world are sure to have some form of screw or nut driver in their personal toolbox. However, there are some screw and nut drivers that have been manufactured specifically for electrical work.

 

Aside from specialised drivers, it’s important to make sure you always have Philips head and flathead screwdrivers with you at all times. Whether it’s removing and installing switches, outlets, cover plates or other devices, these tools will always come in handy. Be sure to have a variety of size options also, as this will keep you well-equipped for any task.

 

  1. Pliers

A good, solid pair of pliers is a must-have for any and every electrician. Handles need to be comfortable and easy to grip, that open and close is a nice, smooth manner. Having several size options again would be ideal to suit a range of tasks. Besides the traditional pair of pliers, there are others that will most definitely come in handy for any sparky. These include:

  • Side-cutting and diagonal-cutting – Used to cut wires to specific lengths
  • Tongue and groove – Used to remove knockouts from metal electrical boxes and tighten clamps.
  • Needle-nose or long nose – Made with thin, grasping ends, these pliers make it easier to reach small spaces.

 

  1. Fish Tape

Also known as ‘draw wire’ or ‘electricians snake’, this handy tool is used to pull and push stranded or sold wire through a conduit or fishing cables across ceilings or down walls. It can be retracted and deployed when needed as it comes on a reel which always means it’s easy to grip.

 

  1. Multi-Functional Tester

Without a doubt, one of the most essential tools for an electrician, the multi-functional tester or MFT is a requirement for any electrician to ensure that any installation is correctly installed and that all test readings meet the requirements as laid out in the IET regulations.

 

  1. Battery Drill

Battery drills are used by electricians to drill holes in wood, walls or other tough surfaces and fixing screws and fasteners onto surfaces. The type of drill used will vary depending on the task-at-hand, for example, a lower-voltage cordless drill might be used when fastening work is required. Whereas for drilling into concrete, a hammer drill would be used as this provides increased impact and will drill holes at a faster rate.

 

  1. Electrical Wall Chaser

A fantastic time-saving tool, electric wall chasers are used to cut narrow grooves and channels into walls in order to install cables or a conduit. The electric motor powers electric discs similar to those found in angle grinders and some even come with a vacuum cleaner connection, allowing for great dust-free working environments.

 

And there you have it, the best and most essential tools for electricians! For those of you just starting out your career in the electrical industry, we hope our list of top tools can help provide you with some quality additions to your toolbox to help make your electrical work safer and much more efficient. To those of you who are considering entering the electrical industry, we can also help with our range of electrician courses! All of which guarantee the skills, knowledge and qualifications needed to embark on a successful career as an electrician.

Browse Our Electrical Courses >

Electric Car Charging at Home

Over the last few years, the popularity and demand in environmentally friendly living solutions have grown dramatically, none more so than electric cars and vehicles. With the biggest and best names in the automotive industry releasing flagship electric iterations of their most beloved models, as well as introducing entirely new ones, more and more homeowners are taking notice and investing in electric vehicles (EVs). But why the big fuss? Well, there are several reasons.

Benefits of electric vehicles

  • Better for the environment – The main and most obvious reason behind the rise in popularity of electric cars and vehicles is the positive impact they have on the environment. By choosing to drive an EV, you are helping to decrease the harmful air pollution caused by exhaust emissions. Most EVs are also manufactured using eco-friendly production through recycled and bio-based materials.
  • Health & safety improvements – As a result of reduced carbon emissions, air quality will improve and so will overall health. Due to electric vehicles being far less noisy than petrol and diesel vehicles, there will also be decreased levels of noise pollution. According to recent findings, several EV features can improve safety also. Due to a lower centre of gravity, they feel less likely to roll over as well as carrying less risk of major fires and explosions.
  • More cost-effective – One of the biggest reasons why people are choosing to go electric for their cars and vehicles is down to the huge long-term savings they will make. Firstly, electric vehicles offer much lower running costs with the electricity needed to charge an EV working out at around a third as much per kilometre as buying petrol for the same vehicle. Secondly, EVs are cheaper to maintain as a result of fewer moving parts than conventional petrol or diesel vehicles. There is relatively little servicing and no expensive parts that need to be replaced often.

So, why is all of this important? As more and more people begin to turn to a greener way of driving, the need for electric chargers to be installed in convenient locations such as homes is going to rise – great news for professionals that are able to provide this service. Access Training Academies have taken notice of this demand and as a result, now offer a choice of two brand-new electrical courses that allows both novices and professionals in the electrical industry to become competent and qualified in installing EV chargers.

 

Our courses for electric car charging at home

The first of our two courses is the Eco Electrical Course, perfect for anyone looking to pursue a career within the electrical industry. Candidates who enrol onto this course will learn the following:

  • The fundamentals of domestic electrical work
  • Testing electrical installations at an industry level
  • How to install electric vehicle charging points

This course aims to provide an all-encompassing introduction into the electrical trade with the addition of green electrical training. You can learn more and enquire about this course below.

Eco Electrical Course >

 

The second of our two courses is our Electric Vehicle Charging Installation Course. Ideal for experienced electricians that have worked in the industry for many years, looking to add electric vehicle charger installation to their repertoire of skills. Candidates who enrol onto this two-day course will learn the following:

  • How to install vehicle charging points
  • EV charging point commissioning
  • How to inspect and test your installations

On completion of this course, candidates will be able to register on the Rolec approved installers scheme, which can result in job referrals and grants of up to £500 per installation. You can learn more and enquire about this course below.

Electric Vehicle Charging Installation Course >

 

For more information on our range of courses that allow you to install electric car chargers at home, be sure to get in touch with a member of the Access Training Academies team today. Also, don’t forget to browse our full range of electric courses suited to individuals with a mix of experience and abilities.

Electrical jobs have long been labelled “future-proof” in the UK, providing an irreplaceable home maintenance service that is vital for day-to-day living. The rise in popularity of electric cars and eco-friendly fuels has only strengthened this theory and the job of an electrician remains one of the most stable and secure occupations in the UK.

But how does this compare to electricians operating in the USA? Is the salary for an electrician in the USA as good as it here in Britain? Well, it appears that electricians in the USA make quite a lot of money for their services too. Electricians throughout the United States demand big bucks and respectable salaries for their services.

 

electrician salary in america

 

Stateside Salaries

According to a recent article published by Forbes, the national average annual wage of an electrician in America is just over $59k. This equates to a highly respectable £46k/annum here in the UK.

To put that into perspective, the Office of National Statistics reports that the average salary for a UK doctor is £41,494, meaning the average American electrician earns 10% more than a British doctor.

Even more impressively, this figure is merely the average salary across the country. Drilling down further into state-specific averages reveals some even more electrifying statistics.

 

Electric Empire

Using occupational data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Forbes notes that the average salary for electricians varies notably from state to state.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, New York boasts the highest average salary for US electricians with an average electrical salary of $77,810/annum.

In UK money, that translates to an average salary of approximately £60.5k for those working in “The Empire State”, representing a monetary increase of over 10% in the last five years.

 

Crossing Borders

Outside of New York, Alaska, Illinois, Hawaii, New Jersey and Minnesota also offer electricians a healthy chunk of change, all with an average salary of over $70k/year.

Meanwhile, Oregon, California, Washington and Massachusetts round out the top 10 US states for electrical wages, all boasting average electrician salaries of over $68k/year.

Even the lowest-earning states earn over $43k/annum on average which translates to well over £33k a year, which is nothing to sneer at either.

 

Become an Electrician

These facts and figures coming out of “The Land of Opportunity” reinforce the positive attitudes towards electrical work domestically as a viable trade that’s well worth pursuing as a career. Electricians in the UK & USA earn enough money to live comfortable lives, so an electrical career is an appealing option on both sides of the pond.

Whether you’re a young person looking to enter the working world as part of the electrical trade or an experienced worker considering making the switch from your current job to retrain as an electrician, Access Training UK can help make your electric dreams a reality.

At Access Training UK, we have a variety of electrician courses available that are specifically designed to efficiently and effectively allow you to learn how to become an electrician without any prior experience.

Meanwhile, we also offer additional courses for existing electrical professionals looking to hone their craft and develop their skills to become even better in their field of work. Whether you’re a novice or a seasoned veteran, we can help you achieve your goals of becoming a better you.

 

For more information on electrician courses from Access Training UK, why not drop us a line today? Call now on 0800 345 7492 or get in touch online by clicking the button below.

Contact Us

Self-employed electricians in the UK have been left buzzing this month as average earnings reached their highest level on record.

According to data analysis by Hudson Contract, October payroll figures confirm that earnings for electricians in England and Wales rose by 5.8%, amounting to a weekly average of £1165.

 

money, electrician wages

 

Record-Breaking Wages

Hudson Contract is a payroll firm responsible for well over 2000 construction companies in the UK.

The firm has been analysing subcontractor earning since March 2008 and in the entire 11+ year span of those records, electrician wages have never been higher.

Welsh electricians saw an incredible spike in earnings growth with a rise of over 25%. Meanwhile, both the south-east and the north-west also saw sizeable peaks, both with a growth of over 8%.

Despite the boosts elsewhere, electrician’s in the east of England remain the highest earnings, topping off at an average of £1363/week which equates to a theoretical £70k/annum.

 

A Lucrative Career Path

On average, electricians regularly find themselves within the top three earners in the construction industry and this latest statistic proves once again just how lucrative an electrical career can be.

Managing Director of Hudson Contract, Ian Anfield, had this say:

“Despite political uncertainty and a general election, freelance electricians have never earned more. We hope this message reaches young people considering a career in construction.”

 

Electrical Careers at Access Training UK

As the figures suggest, there’s never been a better time to consider a career in the electrical industry, with the potential to earn respectable annual salaries that rival and surpass most graduates.

Here at Access Training, we can help you get your career on track with our variety of electrician courses. Whether you’re a total novice taking your first steps in the electrical game or a seasoned veteran hoping to sharpen your skills with some additional knowledge, we have the course for you.

 

New Career Courses

Perfect for those with little to no experience, our beginner courses include the following:

Essential Electrical Course

Professional Electrician Course

Premier Electrical Course

 

Trade Professional Courses

For the more seasoned professional, we offer the following courses, designed to expand your existing knowledge:

Part P Domestic Electrical Installer

18th Edition

Part P & 18th Edition

PAT Testing

Initial Verification

Periodic Inspection & Testing

Fundamental Inspection Testing

Combined Inspection & Testing

Electrical Design Course

 

For more information on the wide range electrician courses at Access Training UK, why not drop us a line today? Call now on 0800 345 7492 or get in touch online by clicking the link below.

Get in Touch

The last month has seen school-leavers across the UK celebrate and commiserate over their GCSE and A-Level results.

Nevertheless, regardless of the score, the outcome has largely been met by the same question: “What now?”

For many, higher education is the logical next step; however, there is an alternate route that poses a wide range of benefits.

Picking up a trade fresh out of school can be a wise move that pays off for years to come, particularly when it comes to the electrical trade.

How so? Read on to find out…

 

electrical careers, electrical training, electrician courses

 

“University Is Not For Everyone”

Higher education has long been held up as the pinnacle of education and must for school-leavers looking to better themselves.

However, in recent years, that has often not been the case, with many graduates struggling to find employment post-university.

Senior Group Technical Presenter at NICEIC, Darren Staniforth, had this to say:

“University is not for everyone and the perception that you can only have a successful career if you get a degree is a false one.

“The construction industry is a well-paid sector that offers a vast array of opportunities. Yet, it is still viewed by some as a third-rate industry for people who do not perform well at school.

“A trade is a viable career path which gives students the chance to learn specific skills that can open up many doors and avenues in the future – including working abroad.”

 

Conducting Research

These sentiments were backed by figures from the Federation of National Builders, who noted that construction apprentices will go on to earn thousands of pounds more every year than many of their university-educated counterparts.

According to their research, the FMB found that the average annual salary of UK electricians was an impressive £47k, while the average university graduate in England earns £32k/year, noting that a shortage in skilled workers makes the construction industry a very lucrative career path.

These sentiments were echoed by the experts at the Pensions Policy Institute, who worked out that even a 22-year-old electrician on an average salary of £18k could have a pension pot worth £111k by the time they retire. Talk about investing in your future!

 

Electrical Courses with Access Training

If you’re one of those school-leavers fresh off your GCSE or A-Level results, now is the perfect time to consider an electrical career. Both rewarding and useful, a training to become an electrician is extremely worthwhile on a number of levels.

Best of all, with electrical courses at Access Training, you don’t need any prior experience to get your journey started!

 

New Career Courses

Our beginner courses are ideal for those with limited or no experience.

These include:

Essential Electrical Course

Professional Electrician Course

Premier Electrical Course

 

Trade Professional Courses

For more experienced, we also offer a range of courses designed to build on your existing knowledge.

These include:

Part P Domestic Electrical Installer

18th Edition

Part P & 18th Edition

PAT Testing

Initial Verification

Periodic Inspection & Testing

Fundamental Inspection Testing

Combined Inspection & Testing

Electrical Design Course

 

For more information on electrical training and electrician courses from Access Training UK, why not get in touch today? Call now on 0800 345 7492 or get in touch online using the button below.

Get in Touch

Whoever said “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks” must have had one very lazy, disobedient dog. After all, it’s also been said that “life begins at 40” – so why not give your career a new lease of life by retraining with us?

Becoming an electrician at 40 years old may seem like a drastic change of pace, but it can be a welcome transition if you're looking to shake up your professional life or simply enhance your existing skillset.

 

becoming an electrician at 40

 

Why become an electrician?

The number of workers aged 40+ seeking a new career path has seen a steady increase in recent years, and trade work has emerged as a top choice for those brave enough to change their trajectory. But why?

Barring some drastic technological advancement, most British homes and workplaces are going to need a steady supply of electricity for the foreseeable future, making energy-related trades a great choice for anyone looking to pursue a new career path.

What’s more, the autonomy that comes from learning a trade can be a real breath of fresh air. Getting some electrical qualifications under your belt not only opens up opportunities with established companies like the “Big Six” (British Gas, EDF, Scottish Power, E.ON, Npower, and SSE), it also creates a clear and realistic route to self-employment, allowing you to set your own hours, be your own boss, and work for yourself.

 

How to become an electrician at 40

There are many reasons why a person might want to become an electrician at 40, ranging from a voluntary career change to unforeseen redundancy. Whatever your reason, the path to a successful electrician career starts with a single step in the right direction.

If you’re reading this blog – congratulations! That first step starts here. So kudos for being proactive…now what?

Well, the road to becoming a qualified electrician has three primary stops along the way:

 

1. Training

Typically achieved on a full or part-time basis, training will provide you with the essential knowledge and expertise on how to do the job efficiently, safely and professionally.

 

2. Work Experience

As with any job, practical experience is vital if you're going to transfer your knowledge of electrical theory into a practical, real-world environment.

 

3. Assessment

Once you’re equipped with the theoretical knowledge and practical experience, a final assessment will determine if you’re ready to become an electrician and enter the trade. This part is important, because practising electricians are required to hold certain qualifications before they can start working.

 

While the specifics of your electrical training programme will vary depending on the course you choose, these three steps provide a basic blueprint of what to expect when you enrol.

Electrical Training Courses >

After you’ve completed each stage on this electrifying journey, you’ll reach your final destination as a fully-qualified electrician!

 

Become an electrician

 

Benefits of retraining at 40

While it may seem like a daunting task, becoming an electrician at 40 is far from impossible. In fact, it can be a hugely exciting journey for anyone brave enough to make the leap.

Don’t let Father Time put you off either – you’re never too old to learn something new. What’s more, mature students can have the hot hand over their younger counterparts in a variety of ways.

Mature students typically have a firm career path in mind when they re-enter education, along with a clear idea of where they want to go once qualified. Time away from the educational highways and by-ways can also provide career clarity and motivation to truly knuckle down.

For mature students, the decision to retrain is a conscious one made individually (unlike many teenage students, who can be easily swayed and led astray by friends and family influence). This can also translate into a more focused approach to learning, making the temptation to miss a session or neglect course revision seem a lot less attractive.

Additionally, life experience can be a real asset in the classroom, adding another dimension to your approach to learning. The self-discipline needed to succeed on a trade training course can be easily transferred from personal to professional life experience; the same can be said for organisation and prioritising.

 

The perks of becoming an electrician at 40

From a professional standpoint, there are also further benefits to being aged 40+. As a general rule of employment, employers typically like mature graduates of any ilk as they come ready-made with many key attributes attached. These employer-friendly specs include two important things: experience and qualifications.

While a younger, newly-qualified electrician may have youthful exuberance on their side, they can also lack experience in the working world and can also at times still be relatively immature from a professional standpoint.

What’s more, customers are also said to feel most comfortable with a tradesperson over 40. A consumer study by Watersafe showed that customers believed the most trusted age of a tradesperson to be 41. In fact, the most trusted age bracket was 36 to 49, achieving a whopping 50% of the overall vote.

 

Make the jump and become an electrician!

With retirement age getting higher seemingly all the time, staying put in a job you hate is as good as a life sentence. In fact, the feeling of Sunday night dread and Monday morning misery can be a prison in itself.

A career change can be a real shot in the arm, making your working hours more enjoyable but also changing the way you live your life. As the old saying goes: “if you love your job, you’ll never work a day in your life”. Love your job and live your life with a career change that lights a spark inside you.

 

So what are you waiting for? Take the power back into your hands with an electrical training course today! For more information on our electrician courses, click the buttons below and explore a new career now.

Electrical Training Courses   Contact Access Training

quickest way to become an electrician

Being an electrician is a very rewarding occupation: the skills are in high demand, the salary is upwards of £30,000 per annum, and you have the opportunity to be your own boss. Of course, like most good things, becoming an electrician requires work.

You may be wondering what the quickest way to become an electrician is, but the answer to that question depends on the person. Traditionally, electricians have to study in college for years and take on a lengthy apprenticeship in order to become qualified.

Here at Access Training, however, we aim to help you become a qualified electrician in a much shorter timeframe with our Intensive Electrical Courses.

 

What qualification(s) do I need?

Before you can start working as an electrician, you will need to gain a Level 3 qualification to prove that you are competent enough to work as an electrician, ensuring your safety as well as that of others. Our Professional Electrical Course allows you to acquire a number of Level 3 electrical qualifications in a much shorter timeframe than traditional methods. How long this will take will depend on the student, but a fast track course is still one of the quickest ways to become an electrician.

Click here to view more electrical courses >

 

Anyone can be an electrician!

Our courses are designed to suit every level of experience and to fit in with a range of lifestyles. For instance, some students choose to complete their course on a part-time basis so as to accommodate other commitments, like work and family. The more experience you have, the quicker you will complete the course, but we welcome beginners too and it is still possible to get qualified quickly if you work hard.

The courses are flexible so that you can complete them at your own pace, and no matter how long it takes, we aim to help all of our students to achieve their goals. By the time you complete your course and receive your qualifications, you will be competent enough to take on work as an electrician.

To find out more about how long it will take for you to become an electrician, or for advice about any of our courses, please feel free to get in touch. We look forward to helping you become an electrician!

See also: Level 3 Electrical Training

How long does it take to become a qualified electrician?

Stuck in a job you don’t love? Or perhaps you’re considering your options after leaving school? Well, if you’re thinking about learning a trade, you may be wondering how to become an electrician. Read on to find out!

 

How to Become a Qualified Electrician

In order to become a fully-qualified electrician, you will have to complete a level 3 electrical or electro-technical qualification (or equivalent). This is traditionally done through an apprenticeship, as Level 3 will be awarded on completion. However, completing Level 1 and 2 qualifications may help you find a trainee position.

Becoming an Electrician Without an Apprenticeship: Here at Access Training, we offer intensive short-course training packages that will help you to get equally qualified (if not more) without needing to join an apprenticeship scheme.

Electrician Courses >

Whatever route you choose, the typical electrician needs to have:

  • Practical skills
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Organisation skills
  • Social skills
  • Basic maths skills

 

How Long Does It Take to Get Qualified?

The time it takes to become a qualified electrician will depend on the study route you choose to take.

Generally, apprenticeships take three years to complete and will involve one day a week at college and four days within a related job position. However, many colleges offer two-year fast-track options for advanced students, as well as part-time study, which could take much longer.

After completion, it is then up to the student whether they continue on to higher education courses or undertake job-related training (e.g. a PAT testing certification).

Students at Access Training can achieve the very highest level in the electrical trade and earn a number of industry-recognised electrical qualifications (including PAT Testing and 18th Edition) in a matter of weeks.

Our electrical training courses are open to candidates of all experience levels. Your experienced tutor will guide you through the certifications needed to become an accomplished electrician, with study and examination for each qualification taking just a few contact days to finish.

So the question is this: do you go down the traditional apprenticeship route, or try something a little different? If the traditional route isn't right for you due to the time it takes to complete (because you'd prefer to quickly earn the experience and skills needed to become a fully-qualified electrician) then browse our range of electrician courses and enrol today!

Browse All Electrician Courses >

If you have any questions regarding our range of electrical training courses, please do not hesitate to contact us today!

UPDATE (08/10/2021): We now offer live online courses that allow you to learn about the electrical trade and the theory that underpins it from the comfort of your own home. These virtual classroom sessions are combined with hands-on learning at our training centre, equipping you with both the knowledge and the skills you'll need to succeed.

 

Read more:

Is Being an Electrician Dangerous
 

When we are contacted by individuals researching electrical training courses, one of their main concerns regarding the profession is the obvious issue of safety. We are repeatedly (and rightly) reminded about the dangers associated with electricity on an everyday level, so it's easy to see why someone might be hesitant regarding the profession, with only the layman's understanding that they will be working with a highly dangerous power source.

Before you decide to become an electrician, it's important to familiarise yourself with the risks associated with the profession. While this may seem rather off-putting at first, it is actually far more beneficial to those looking to build a long-term career as an electrician. When you are aware of the dangers posed to you, as well as to colleagues and members of the public, you are more likely to keep in mind how important it is to follow proper health and safety procedures. As we have noted in a previous post, a career as an electrician can be both lucrative and rewarding, but to be a truly successful electrical engineer you must always keep in mind the possible dangers associated with the job.

Whether you decide to become a domestic installer or a site services electrician, there will be particular risks within your set area, as well as many that are universal. For example, domestic call-outs can be dangerous for electricians, as they are often called to rectify poor work attempted by inexperienced individuals. The best defence against these risks, along with those in many other trade professions, is knowledge. If you receive the right training and qualifications, before going on to uphold the strict guidelines required to work as an electrician, you will ensure that you are able to substantially reduce these risks, almost eliminating them altogether.

To make your choice a bit more straightforward, here are some simple tips for ensuring safety as an electrician:

  • Get the Proper Training - At Access Training, we offer several Electrical Courses which provide you with the opportunity to gain industry recognized qualifications, under the supervision of experienced installers. As industry experts, we uphold strict safety standards, to ensure that you are able to complete your training safely. 

  • Build on Your Knowledge - To progress in your career as an electrician, you will need to expand your knowledge not only by gaining practical experience, but by updating and advancing your existing qualifications. At Access Training, we not only provide courses for beginners, but also for experienced installers.

  • Keep up-to-date on Guidelines and Best Practices - As with any industry, the electrical trade has a strict set of procedures that if followed, should eliminate or reduce the risks of working with electrical currents. Useful guides can be found on the Electrical Safety First and HSE websites.
For more information about our Electrician Courses, please feel free to get in touch today!

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