Need to complete a plastering DIY job but have absolutely no idea where to start? Considering a career change to plastering but lack the expertise to make it happen? Fear not, Access Training is on hand to help prepare you for whatever it is that lies ahead. Like with all trades, the first step is to take a look at exactly what it is and understand some of the terms and definitions you'll come across. To assist with this, we've put together a brief list of some of the common plastering definitions to get you started;

Accelerator: A material that shortens the setting time of plasters and other cement-like materials.

Admixture: Any substance added to a plaster component or plaster mortar for the purpose of modifying its properties.

Aggregate: Granular material that does not contribute to the hardening reaction of the mortar.

Bonding Mortar: A mortar to produce a first bonding coat in a multicoat system. Usually applied in a thin coat.

Correction Time: The maximum time interval during which adjustment is possible without significant loss of final strength. This may be also referred to as adjustability.

Dot and Dab: A technique used to attach plasterboard to walls using small lumps of adhesive.

Float: A tool or procedure used to straighten and level the finish coat, to correct surface irregularities prodDouced by other tools, or to bestow a distinctive surface texture.

Grout:  A mortar or paste for filling crevices, esp. the gaps between wall or floor tiles

Hawk: A tool used by plasterers to hold and carry plaster.

Mortar: A plastic mixture composed of water and a cementitious material, which may be machine or hand applied, and which hardens in place.

Screed: To level or straighten a plaster coat application with a rod, darby or other similar tool

Setting Time: The time after which the mortar begins to harden. After this time the mortar is normally stable in the presence of water.

Substrate: Immediate surface to which the mortar is to be applied. In the case of a coating to be applied to an existing render, the render would be the coating's substrate.

Unsound: This refers to the condition of plaster where the hardened mass has lost internal strength, exhibiting cracking/spalling/delamination/etc. This general state may be contributed to by excessive aggregate addition, water damage, poor drying conditions, overwatering and other factors.

Now that you know some of the definitions you may come across when plastering, its time to have a go at the real thing. However attempting a job without proper training could not only prove expensive, but you might end up doing lasting damage to the wall or surface you're working on. To get the most rounded plastering experience the best option is a comprehensive plastering course from Access Training. With a variety of different courses for different skill levels, our experienced teaching staff will either fully prepare you for future DIY work or help you attain the vital qualifications needed to gain employment as a professional plasterer. With our courses open to people of all ages and backgrounds, you could just be a phonecall away from gaining a valuable new skill that will stay with you for the rest of your life. To find out more please take a look at our courses page or call us on 0800 345 7492.

If you’re looking to find work in the plastering business there are many ways you can find opportunities in the construction industry.  Plastering is a skill that will always be in high demand and often the best way to learn a trade is with on the job training.  However, those serious about plastering as a trade might want to look into one of the many plastering training courses available.

Working as a plasterer can be quite a lucrative career that provides a steady income and lots of work.  Whether you find with a plastering firm or a firm that includes plastering in its range of services, you should find your skills are constantly in demand.  You may also find that once you have been working in the trade for some time and have acquired extensive experience, you might want to go it alone and set up your own plastering business. 

Get the Word Out

Plastering jobs are often obtained through word of mouth and speaking to other contractors.  If you can get the word out that you are looking for work and that you are willing to work long hours and dedicate your time to learning the trade, you may find a job comes along quicker than expected.  You may also want to enquire directly to construction site managers and tell them that you have some level of training or that you are willing to train on the job.  Whilst you might get given light labourer duties at first, you can learn a lot by being on site and getting involved.  If you can get yourself on a new-build construction site this is one of the best ways to learn more about the plastering and rendering skills you will be required to know.

Your local job centre will also have details of any plastering jobs in your area and also any training courses on offer.  Grants are often available for training and you’ll learn everything you need to start plastering straight away.  The good thing to know is that plasterers are always in demand.  If you can prove your skills and your worth, you’ll find your phone constantly ringing with offers of work. 

Fine Tune Your Skills

Plasterers often add other strings to their bow including painting, tiling and flooring.  Many domestic clients will be looking for a tradesman that has a wide range of skills so taking the time to learn new trades will open up many more doors to you.

Get in touch to learn more about our training courses!

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