Electrician Salary

If you are considering becoming an electrician, you may be happy to know that electricians have the highest average salary out of all the trade jobs in 2018. 

According to multiple reports, electricians have enjoyed the best annual salary in a trade job for many years. This varies by experience, of course, but it is clear that becoming an electrician can be a lucrative career path. Not to mention, it can be a rewarding and challenging job that keeps you out of the office and out in the open most of the day. 

How much do electricians earn?

The national careers service reports that the average electrician salary sits somewhere between £18,000-£42,000 per year. That's based on 30-40 hours of work per week. While there is a large gap between the lower and upper end of the scale, this is largely dependent on experience. 

  • Starter Electrician Salary - £18,000 - £23,000
  • Experienced Electrician Salary - £25,000 - £35,000
  • Highly Experienced Electrician Salary - Up to £42,000

According to the Office of National Statistics, the average electrician salary for 2018 is £30,784. This is an increase from the year before and shows that electricians salaries are increasing on a healthy incline year by year. In comparison, the average pay for a Plumber is £29,799 and £26,416 for a Carpenter in 2018. 

What qualifications do you need to become an electrician? 

Experience comes with time, but getting a head start with the right qualifications is the best step to take. The basic qualification needed to become an electrician is a Level 3 Electrical Qualification, which we provide here at Access Training. To enrol on one of our Level 3 electrical qualification courses, you do not need any previous qualifications as we will walk you through stage-by-stage. You'll learn everything you need to know to become an electrician in either our Essential Electrical Course, Professional Electrical Course and Premier Electrical Course

Furthermore, if you'd like to progress even further and earn a better electrician salary, you can gain further qualifications to become a specialist in your field. Here are just a few specialist electrician courses we provide:

Electrician Qualifications

We are dedicated to providing quality courses here at Access Training. Find out more about our courses here

In an unpredictable Britain, vocational training could be your light at the end of the tunnel. Learning a highly sought-after skill through vocational training is dependable to way to ensure you maintain job stability in an ever-changing market.

Due to the recent bad weather, we've seen people across the UK struggling with major plumbing issues and even going without power in severe cases. As a society, we are so reliant on these basic necessities to get through the day, that the prospect of being without them is frightening! In fact, with a large percentage of UK workers spending 8 hours a day on a computer, when we lose our electricity supply - businesses grind to a halt. 

But who maintains and safeguards the installation of these basic needs? The skilled trade workers amongst us, that's who. As the world of technology increases so does the demand for those skilled in the trades. This is why we believe vocational training is just as, if not more so, important than a university degree. 

So, what are the benefits of vocational training?

1. No costly debt from University

Recently, the Prime Minister Theresa May announced that University Students in England face "one of the most expensive systems of university tuition in the world".

One of the main benefits of training to become a tradesperson is that you have no major debt looming over you once you finish your course. In fact, as soon as you receive your certificate, you can immediately start earning money from what you've learnt! Vocational training typically costs a mere fraction of university costs and it also provides more financial stability as trade skills are always in demand.

Many people go to university nowadays because they're unsure what they want to do in the future. Sure, this may seem like a good idea at the time, but is it really worth the debt? If you're not dedicated to the path you've chosen, it's not worth spending 3 years learning about something you won't pursue in the future.

As said by entrepreneur, Joseph Valente, who set up his own very successful plumbing business ImpraGas, 'If you're motivated by the business, that's going to drive you every day'. Joseph believes you shouldn't 'waste three years doing something that your hearts not in' and we agree. 

Vocational courses ensure you're on the right path straight away and can easily make your trade your passion. 

2. Job stability

There will always be a need for plumbers, electricians and builders. As previously mentioned, it's difficult to imagine how we would live without these basic necessities provided for us. The skills learnt through a trade course will always be vital to a thriving society and will ensure you're in demand at all times.

After learning a skill that is needed in every part of the world, you'll find it even easier to pursue the right career for you. If you want to move abroad for work, go ahead! If you want to switch companies, there are ton's more which are desperate for your skill set. If you want to be your own boss - do it! 

The qualifications and skills gained from vocational courses provide you with the stability and freedom most people aspire to have. 

3. It takes far less time to become qualified

On average, training courses for vocational trades take months rather than years to complete. This is the ideal way to train for anyone who is looking to switch careers and has a job alongside their training course. 

Of course, many people gain their vocational training through apprenticeships rather than vocational training courses. Apprenticeships are good if you're just coming out of school and can afford the low pay. Perseverance and patience is key to apprenticeships - but if you have commitments, it may not be possible to dedicate yourself to a job that cannot pay your bills. When you reach adulthood, money is a necessity and low pay for a couple years could put your livelihood at risk. 

Many training courses are flexible to fit around you and so you can easily maintain your job whilst training for a new trade profession. 

4. You can start working sooner

Another benefit of vocational training is that it provides you with all the experience you need to start working right away. Many graduates coming out of university find that this is not the case with their degree and they still need to gain that all-important experience.

Learning a trade means you are skilled in this area as soon as you complete your course. You can start working for a company, work freelance or even strive to set up your own company.

Anne Milton, the Minister of State for Skills and Apprenticeships, recently said that apprenticeships and courses are "on-the-job training. What's not to like?". She also believes that "the default should not be University. No matter how bright you are, there are other options out there."

5. Vocational trades are well paid

On average, Plumbers earn around £31,000 per year. Electricians earn around £32,500 and builders earn around £37,500. Compared to the average starting salary for graduates hovering around £19,000-£22,000, it's fair to say that a vocational training course could work in your favour financially.

These wages can increase substantially in different areas and will progress over time. As with everything, it pays to have patience in an industry. However, if you embark on a vocational training course, rather than a university course, you will start your career in the industry sooner and progress in the salary department quicker. 

If these benefits of vocational training have convinced you to pursue this path, Access Training Academies are the largest provider of vocational courses in the UK. Take a look and find the right course for you today. 

In Britain alone, on average 3.8 people out of every 1,000 employees are made redundant. This includes those who have taken voluntary redundancy because they found their job role was no longer significant. Therefore, throughout your training career, you’re very likely to find yourself retraining someone who has recently lost their job.

Redundancy is often likened to the grieving process or bereavement as it is an incredibly difficult time in someone’s life. Especially if someone has been in their job for a number of decades, losing that responsibility can leave a person feeling completely lost and displaced.

Retraining someone who has been made redundant requires a different training approach to the usual student. Here are our main training tips to consider when retraining the recently redundant.

 

1) Assess the needs of your students


Before you start your training plan, it is important to fully grasp what they want to achieve through the training course. Do they want to go back into their old line of work? Do they want to develop skills in a new field?


If you’re in a class full of people who have recently been made redundant but want to improve their skills in their past industry, you should structure your training plan around them. It would be a wasted effort to go over information your students already know.


2) Ensure you provide office hours


Those who have recently been made redundant will appreciate the opportunity to talk to you on a one-to-one basis. Office hours are the best way to provide this support and will also help you understand your students on a personal basis.


The more you learn about your students, the easier it becomes to train them. For example, if someone worked for many years as a tradesperson prior to their redundancy, they will most likely have expert knowledge of that industry and have many transferable skills that will help them with their training.


3) Include Interactive Training techniques


This popular method of training is used in most classrooms and with good reason. Interactive training is the best way to motivate your students to stay engaged. While you may be tempted to plan your lessons around fitting in masses of information, it is important your students are actually paying attention.


The interactive training technique involves breaking sessions up with quizzes, demonstrations, case studies, group discussions and Q & A sessions. These short breaks help keep students involved in the lesson and will provide those with past experience the opportunity to share their knowledge. This technique works with all members of your class, including those who have been made redundant.

 

4) Use the Motivational Interviewing method


As you can imagine, redundancy can largely damage someone’s confidence. They may have taken up retraining to help them feel confident in their abilities again.
Motivational interviewing is a good method of evoking a positive and motivated response from your students. The steps to take when using this method are as follows:

  • Engaging – establish a relationship based on trust and respect between yourself and your student.
  • Focusing - using an ongoing process to maintain direction.
  • Evoking – encourage confidence in your student by using their own goals and motivations to inspire your training.
  • Planning – create a plan of action with the view to reach the students goals that you and your student commit to.

Motivational interviewing can be done in office hours or before lessons even start to help you fully understand what your student hopes to gain from this course. It’s one of the best ways to encourage your students by showing them you actually care. 


Always remember that anyone can be retrained but it takes a dedicated trainer to do an effective job.

Would you like to work with us here at Access Training? Get in touch today to see the jobs we have on offer! 

Should I become an eletrician?

Wondering whether or not to become an electrician? Well, we can certainly assure you that it's a very rewarding career choice. It's also a very stable source of income - electricity is a crucial part of modern life, and there are all sorts of important jobs that can only be done by qualified electricians.

Whether you are fresh out of school or looking for a new career a bit later in life, there are plenty of good reasons to become an electrician. We've put together just a few of them below.

Five Reasons Why You Should Become an Electrician

  • You can be your own boss

Becoming a qualified electrician will provide you with the option of starting your own business. If you've always loved the idea of being your own boss and choosing the hours you work, learning to work as an electrician could be a great choice for you. Many electricians are self-employed and demand for qualified electrical engineers is always high.

  • The salary is above average

Electricians typically earn more than any other tradespeople. According to Total Jobs, the average yearly salary for an electrician job is approximately £32,500. Of course, it's possible to earn even more than this through self-employed work, career progression, and bolstering your skillset with additional training courses and qualifications.

  • You can work anywhere

The great thing about an electrician's job is that they can work wherever it suits them. There is a huge need for electricians nationwide - not only does this give you the freedom to travel around, it also means you have great job stability.

  • You can start at any age

Due to the flexible nature of electrician work, it is possible to become a qualified electrician no matter how old you are. If you're straight out of school, you can start training to become an electrician right away; if you're looking to start a new career, you can start training for your electrician qualification alongside your current work.

  • You don't need a degree

Becoming an electrician does not require a university education, meaning you will not rack up thousands of pounds' worth of student loan debt before entering the world of work. Training to become an electrician costs far less than a university degree, and you can even train around your current schedule if you wish to continue working in the meantime. Here at Access Training, we offer courses to suit everyone's needs.

Find out more about Access Training's electrical courses >

is being an electrician fun

With most people now working well into their 60s (if not later), it's important to choose a career that you're likely to enjoy. As those who have taken an Access Training electrical course will know, electricians make good money, often get to choose their own hours, and are in very high demand in the UK right now. But is being an electrician fun? Is it a job that people genuinely enjoy, or just another way to pay the bills?

The answer mostly depends on what you personally enjoy doing. We find that most of our graduates very much enjoy their new line of work, but it's good to find out if it’s something you’ll like before you start your electrical training.

With that in mind, here are few things to consider:

Do you find fixing things rewarding?

One of the things electricians most enjoy about their job is the satisfaction of fixing things. Having to work out what’s wrong and then correct the problem takes a lot of knowledge – if you like problem solving, you’ll probably find being an electrician fun!

Do you like being active?

You may not realise what an active life electricians lead. A typical day can include climbing up and down stairs, scaffolding and ladders many times. You may also have to crawl into small places. Either way, you'll need to be in relatively good shape. It’s far from an office job, so if you don’t like getting up and about then you may not find the job too fun.

Do you want a job with variety?

Being an electrician gives you the freedom to explore new work every day. You aren’t confined to one place and this means you’ll have lots of different experiences and meet lots of different people. Many electricians love that they constantly get to switch up their daily routine, finding a lot of fun in the diversity of the job.

For more information on what it’s like to be an electrician, feel free to contact us today. Alternatively, click here to view our electrical training packages.

Competent Person Electrical Register

After much deliberation on what can be done to ensure consumers are hiring safe and qualified tradespeople to carry out work in their homes, the Select Committee on Building Regulations has announced that a single Competent Person Electrical Register is ready to go live. The decision was made following a recommendation made by the Communities and Local Government Select Committee, with the register set to officially go live on June 30th.

Is it mandatory to join the competent person electrical register? 

This marks a similar move to the long-standing Gas Safe Register, joining which is a legal requirement of all gas engineers operating in the United Kingdom. However, joining the Competent Person Electrical Register is not mandatory, making it similar to the plumbing equivalent Water Safe. The move to create a single register was welcomed by existing Competent Person Scheme brands ELECSA and NICEIC. Although both put forward positive recommendations and supported parts of the report, they also felt some points were not explored thoroughly and "did not reflect the true state of the industry".

Under building regulations Part P, all fixed domestic electrical installations must be suitably installed, tested and inspected to ensure that they are in safe working order. Without achieving a Part P certificate and joining a Competent Person scheme, electricians are required by law to have their work independently verified by an external inspector.

When the scheme (full name: Registered Competent Person Electrical) goes live on June 30th, all full scope Part P electricians in England and Wales will be added automatically by their provider and encouraged to use the logo as a symbol of their qualification. An official launch event will then follow on the 2nd of July in the Palace of Westminster. Minister for Communities and Local Government, Stephen Williams MP, will give a keynote speech to a wide array of key industry stakeholders and MPs, alongside NAPIT Group Chief Executive Officer, Michael Andrews and Chief Executive Officer of Certsure, Emma Clancy.

Clancy commented that the new website, will "become the one stop shop for consumers looking to hire an electrician to carry out work in their home."

Attaining a Part P certificate and joining a Competent Person Scheme is a vital part of becoming a domestic electrician, and something we can fully prepare you for here at Access Training.

Whether its part of a more intensive electrician course or the single qualification you're looking for, our experienced tutors will guide you through everything you need to know to reach this important step in your career. To speak to one of our course advisers and find out more give us a call on 0800 345 7492.

electric shower

Firstly when you’re having problems with your electric shower don’t attempt to fix it, this is false economy – you’re much better off changing the item completely. Here are a few steps to show you how to change an electric shower. 

  • Step One - Safely take off the front cover of the electric shower box. There will be at least 1 or possibly 2 small screws holding this in place. Next, take off the front temperature and control knobs by pulling them straight off (this shouldn’t be too difficult to do). With the front cover off you should be able to see a valve on the water pipe going into the shower unit, it should have a screw slot in the middle of the valve. Turn this a ¼ turn either way and test the shower to see if this has turned off the water. You can use the control knob by temporarily re-attaching it to the shower to get the water to flow.
  • Step Two - When changing an electric shower, you must turn off the electric supply at the consumer unit (or fuse board as it’s commonly known). The fuses/trips should be marked but if they’re not, the 1 of 2 possible trips you are going to turn off will be either a 35 amp or a 45 amp depending on the Kilo-watt power of the shower. For a 35 amp fuse/trip, the shower should not be over 8.5 kilowatts. For a shower that is greater in kilowatts, the fuse/trip will be a 45 amp.
  • Step Three - The next step in changing your electric shower is to check that the electric has been turned off by either pulling the cord switch in your bathroom or the wall-mounted one outside. Run the shower and make sure that the running water isn’t warm/hot. With the electric turned off, you can put a notice hanging from the consumer unit to warn others not to turn back on.
  • Step Four - If the water is now off you can take off the water connection where it connects closest to the unit. Undo the electric cable connections and remove the unit, remembering to replace like-for-like in the kilowatt power rating of the unit (this rating can be found somewhere on the old unit, and on the front cover box of the new one).
  • Step Five - When you have connected the new unit to the electric cable and to the water supply, check the water flow through the unit first, then with the cover on the unit you can turn the electric fuse/trip back on. Go back to the unit and turn the wall-mounted switch or pull the cord on, turn up the thermostatic control on the unit and the water control knob to on. Your new shower should be working, but with the new shower unit you will have the manufacturer’s instructions in the box. Follow these carefully, and it should be safe for you to install.

- Mark Lewis

 Would you like to learn more about the kind of DIY plumbing tasks you can perform yourself around the home? Access Training offers a number of bespoke plumbing courses for both DIY enthusiasts and those looking for a career as a professional plumber. You'll have access to our state-of-the-art training facilities and be taught by fully-trained plumbers with many years' experience in the trade. To find out more, give us a call on 0800 345 7492.