An Electrician

Are you thinking about becoming an electrician and wondering what a typical working day would look like? In this blog post, we look at the day-to-day life of an electrician and what jobs they tend to do!

 

But first: what exactly is an electrician? 

An electrician is a qualified professional who specialises in a variety of electrical work, such as planning and installing wiring systems, testing and maintaining electrical equipment, and running power supplies to public events.

If you decide to become an electrician, you will have to choose between entering the field as a generalised electrician or working in a specialist niche. This choice will determine what the day-to-day functions of the job are; not all electricians tackle exactly the same tasks.

However, in most areas of this field, the general daily tasks remain the same. 

 

What jobs do electricians do?

Throughout the majority of the working week, general electricians will have to conduct a set of common tasks required by businesses and homeowners. These often involve...

  • Planning, writing and understanding diagrams and floor plans

  • Repairing damaged wiring and equipment using a range of power and hand tools

  • Diagnosing wiring issues, failing components, poor connections and overloaded circuits using specialised tools such as thermal imaging

  • Testing electrical systems and circuits using devices such as oscilloscopes and voltmeters

  • Assessing electrical systems, components and equipment to spot any potential hazards and defects

  • Planning and installing electrical wiring and fixtures based on job specs and local codes

 

Working hours of an electrician 

The majority of electricians work a standard eight-hour shift, five days a week and sometimes even on weekends. However, as an electrician, you should be prepared to work during off-hours too, dealing with the wiring and voltage issues that can occur at any hour of the day. This is common throughout the electrical industry, with many general electricians available for on-call emergency service. 

The work you are assigned will very much depend on the terms of your employment. Whether you're an independent contractor or working for an established company, you will either set your own schedule of work or be assigned jobs to complete across a variety of different sites. 

One thing's for sure, though: all electricians should be prepared to work for longer than planned. Once you begin working, you can quickly discover that the one job you were assigned to do is just a small part of a much bigger problem that will take more time to fix.

 

More on the jobs electricians do

As you can see from the information above, working as a successful electrician requires a wide range of specialised skills, as well as good reading comprehension and analysing in order to determine the best route to success for each individual job.

Because of the danger and complexity of electrical work, it is essential that you study and learn from qualified and experienced professionals. 

Our Electrical Training Courses >

 

Additional Resources:

 

A controversial advertising campaign commissioned by the Government to encourage people to change career if they’re in danger of redundancy or at risk as furlough as about to come to an end, has been pulled following complaints abouts its content and the lockdown conditions changing once again. 

 

Social media reacted with fury after the adverts called for people employed within the arts and culture, struggling sectors to ‘Rethink, Reskill, Reboot’, with an emphasis on considering a career in ‘cyber’. The ‘Cyber First’ adverts featured 4 different people in different roles but primarily a ballerina named Fatima who is pictured tying up her ballet shoes next to the words, ‘ Fatima’s next job could be in cyber. (She just doesn't know it yet)

The reaction has been ‘negative’ to say the least, with many responding to the calls to ‘Rethink, Reskill, Reboot’, with accusations of condescension and a dismissive attitude by those in the arts and culture sector, as it asked for them to consider other new careers, in ‘cyber’. 

Whilst this is obviously an area of future growth with the digitisation of virtually every aspect of our lives, the connection of people directly to specific areas is a risky approach for many reasons. When interviewed recently, Rishi Sunak admitted that many people are going to have to abandon their current jobs and retrain in ‘sustainable’ and ‘viable’ sectors: ‘I can’t pretend that everyone can do exactly the same job that they were doing at the beginning of the crisis’, he said.

 

“If you’ve spent years, possibly even decades, working in a specific job role, then the expectation to shift suddenly and seamlessly to another is obviously a tricky prospect.” 

 

This is a wiser approach in our view, to offer advice and to suggest there are other options is far more subtle. But compounding this, the government has devised an ingenious and comprehensive online questionnaire to help you answer the big question: what to retrain as? Based on your preferences and skills, the intention was to make finding a suitable new career much, much easier. Unfortunately, however, it hasn’t quite gone exactly to plan either...

Some questionnaire results have produced some, unlikely results. And people have found much hilarity in this bizarre but welcome bit of light relief, with ‘fair-ground worker’, ‘boxer’, ‘fish-monger’, ‘stonemason’ and ‘countryside rangers’. One person reported that she was apparently assessed as being suitable to be a ‘Bomb Disposal Technician’ or ‘Bingo Caller’.

Among the thousands of unsuitable job suggestions was one lady in her fifties recommended as a stunt-double; responding on Twitter, she optimistically suggested that she should retrain as she ‘could be a stunt-double for an unfit woman in her 50s?’.

Another slight miscalculation involved a self-proclaimed ‘painfully unfit PhD student (who loathed PE throughout her school career and continues to avoid any form of exercise) should retrain as a... ‘professional sportsman’. 

But some results have, at least, shown that the test gives some accurate results, as partakers in this quiz have ended up being told to retrain in… their current job: 

 

‘I’ve just done the government assessment to see what I should retrain as’, wrote one bemused user. ‘I’m going to leave my job as a teacher to become...a teacher’. 

 

You may want to take a look and see what vocations your skills match up to (but don't say we didn't warn you about unexpected outcomes):

https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/skills-assessment

On a serious note, however, this only reflects the gravity of the situation. Many thousands of people across the country are due to have their worlds turned upside down, and forced out of happy, prosperous careers. They are being forced to consider changes that were not part of anyone's plan only a few months ago.

Thankfully though, Access Training offers the perfect way out, but for those who have a desire to get a trade. We are quite clear that there are many other options out there for new careers and training courses to get you there but we will only ever offer advice to those who have asked for it. Not preach it to everyone regardless of their situation. 

Serving those wanting to retrain and change careers to get a trade has been a goal of ours since the beginning, 2003 to be axact; thousands of people from across the employment spectrum have approached us with the aim of retraining and starting out on a fresh path into trades training. 

Now our services may be needed more than ever – and we may be the service that you need. We will however, never condescend you or take your previous experience for granted. Our Career Support Team is here to listen and advise you.

 

"Guys who’ve come from all sorts of backgrounds, taxi drivers, entertainment, even to the point where I’ve had some solicitors because they’re unsure of whether they’re ever going to go back to working in the office.

Anybody who's lost their job... my advice is don't be afraid. With hard work and the right training... you can do anything that you want."

Jimmy Adkins, Access Training Academies Tutor speaking to Robert Peston from ITV



Learn your trade. Get qualified. Make it happen.



 

In latest Covid-19 developments, Wales is preparing itself for a 2-week ‘Firebreaker lockdown’, which takes the entire country back to the restrictive conditions it saw in March. Similarly, Manchester and other large towns across England are on the verge of being made into ‘Tier 3’ restricted zones. The UK is seeing significant and dangerous rises in the number of Covid-19 cases. But as ever, we’re asking the same questions – what does that mean for workers and businesses in the construction industry?

As the country prepares itself for another potential large-scale lockdown, we’re here to sing the praises of the ‘fireproof’ construction industry, which, despite all the odds, is thriving and surviving through this turbulent period. Furlough and lockdowns will likely be things of the future, for months and potentially years to come. Retraining in construction early could be your ticket out of purgatorial furlough schemes, stationary jobs, and a sinking job-support ship. Read on to find out five reasons why we think retraining in construction is a no-brainer.

 

 

  • All construction work is set to continue despite lockdown

 

Although minor repair and maintenance work in private homes is banned in Wales, all other commercial and infrastructural building work is set to continue. Build UK has recently issued a template letter for all construction workers to carry around with them, in case they are mistakenly stopped by police enforcing the lockdown. This letter will have details of the worker, company they work for, and site they are working on – for any workers currently in the construction industry, you can download your own here: https://www.constructionnews.co.uk/health-and-safety/wales-lockdown-workers-issued-letter-of-proof-as-construction-continues-20-10-2020/

In short, construction workers are now treated as essential workers – and rightly so!

This will be a massive reassurance to those working in construction, as it ensures that major projects will go ahead, freeing up a long backlog of projects yet to go ahead. Even better, construction work of all kinds is continuing as planned in England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Ireland too. 

 

‘A sharp output rebound of 13.5% for the whole construction sector is forecast in 2021’ – David Rice, Construction News (October 20th, 2020)

 

 

  • Productivity and demand are at an industry record high

 

A recent forecast has shown that construction industry output has been affected less than first fears indicated. The Construction Products Association predicted an initial 20.6% reduction in output, but this has been lowered to 14.6% – a significant decrease. The industry is one of the few whose performance is actually looking set to improve as time moves on, and is proving to be the safest and most stable place to work at the moment – and, indeed, for a long time to come.

 

 

  • Construction made a quick recovery post-lockdown

 

The speed with which the construction industry got back on its feet is very promising, but it’s all down to one important fact: construction is essential, and tradespeople will always be in high demand. This is exactly what was seen in July and August of 2020, when the demand for construction work, after seeing a backlog of months, skyrocketed. Sites opened quickly after the lockdown, and workers adapted well to the new restrictions. They got their heads down, and did the job – a testament to hard work, determination, and a passion for the trade.

 

 

  • Building sites have adapted well to Covid-19 restrictions

 

When lockdown measures were first relaxed in July and August, allowing construction work to recommence, there were great concerns that social distancing measures would inhibit the productivity of a building site, making work inefficient, slow, and expensive. But this has not been the case – on the contrary, social distancing has hardly affected large-scale, infrastructural building sites at all. The trades have been allowed to continue largely unscathed, in relation to many other sectors across the country.

 

 

  • The lockdown won’t stop you from becoming a tradesperson

 

What the last six months have seen is that the appetite for changing career and retraining as a tradesperson has never been more ravenous. Thousands of people have approached us, from a range of different backgrounds, to seek our services and reskill themselves in whatever aspect or aspects of construction they wish. Taxi drivers, chefs, pilots, entertainers, solicitors – you name it. 

The development of our online portal means that, wherever you are, in whichever ‘Tier’ or whatever state of lockdown, you can begin a course right from the comfort of your own home. Over lockdown, literally thousands of people have benefited from this flexibility, and with more lockdowns potentially looming, we don’t want you to miss out this time.

With the uncertainty ahead which clearly isn’t going away anytime soon, we hope you can see that the decision to retrain really is a ‘no-brainer’. If you think you have what it takes – the practical skills, the determination, and willingness to work for what you want – then Access Training can get you into lucrative, satisfying, and above all important work, in no time at all.


Learn your trade. Get qualified. Make it happen.

In a couple of weeks, the furlough scheme is coming to an end and economists are predicting that what began as a safety net for millions of people, will still result in mass redundancies. But there are reports that construction businesses are expanding due to demand which is great news for those changing careers and getting a trade. 

Rewind back to the beginning of lockdown, a time when furlough seemed, to millions of people, like a blessed relief. It kept thousands of people afloat, supported businesses through a tough time, and made sure that the brutality of the pandemic wasn’t made worse by a crushing economic crash. 

But now, six months on, the end of the furlough scheme is rapidly approaching. Predictions are coming through surrounding the impact of the next six months. And it isn’t looking good. 

It's clear that the situation we’re in as a country is going to be very problematic for many. So we have compiled 5 important points about the current predicament, highlighted so that you have the information you need to make a decision about your future:

 

  • 1.8 million people are predicted to lose their jobs when furlough ends. Estimates now predict a massive surge in unemployment that could reach 12%.
  • 20% of people who received furlough are facing unemployment. According to the Office for Budget Responsibility, 8.9 million people benefited from the furlough scheme. 

 

  • The Office for National Statistics reports that between 7-20th of September, only 11% of workers were signed up to the furlough scheme. This is down from 36% in April.

 

  • The Bank of England reported that it is likely that businesses have been exiting the furlough scheme quicker than we think. They suggest that only 7% of workers are still receiving furlough in September. 
  • The Times reports that, due to ‘weaker demand and uncertainty about the outlook’ ahead, businesses are ‘slashing jobs and investment’. Many workers will not be able to protect themselves from the economic downturn. 

 

However, there is a shining light coming from the construction and trades sector

 

Powered Now has reported the fastest rise in construction output since 2015. This great news was based on information coming from the UK Construction PMI (Purchasing Managers Index).






The report also noted that UK construction companies had rapidly expanded their business activities during the summer as new business had increased in spite of the wider economic issues. Powered Now also made comment on Yahoo Finance regarding the welcomed upturn:

 

‘....the building sector is back! This is great news. It means that this important sector is doing its part in the recovery from Covid-19. The whole industry is still in catch up mode and projects delayed by the lockdown are taking priority. This has helped to spike demand and we expect it to continue…’



So the trades may well be the place to be for a new stable career! Maybe it's time to consider a new direction: Invest in yourself, invest in a new career, and invest in a trade.



Learn your trade. Get qualified. Make it happen.

Electrical jobs have long been labelled “future-proof” in the UK, providing an irreplaceable home maintenance service that is vital for day-to-day living. The rise in popularity of electric cars and eco-friendly fuels has only strengthened this theory and the job of an electrician remains one of the most stable and secure occupations in the UK.

But how does this compare to electricians operating in the USA? Is the salary for an electrician in the USA as good as it here in Britain? Well, it appears that electricians in the USA make quite a lot of money for their services too. Electricians throughout the United States demand big bucks and respectable salaries for their services.

 

electrician salary in america

 

Stateside Salaries

According to a recent article published by Forbes, the national average annual wage of an electrician in America is just over $59k. This equates to a highly respectable £46k/annum here in the UK.

To put that into perspective, the Office of National Statistics reports that the average salary for a UK doctor is £41,494, meaning the average American electrician earns 10% more than a British doctor.

Even more impressively, this figure is merely the average salary across the country. Drilling down further into state-specific averages reveals some even more electrifying statistics.

 

Electric Empire

Using occupational data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Forbes notes that the average salary for electricians varies notably from state to state.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, New York boasts the highest average salary for US electricians with an average electrical salary of $77,810/annum.

In UK money, that translates to an average salary of approximately £60.5k for those working in “The Empire State”, representing a monetary increase of over 10% in the last five years.

 

Crossing Borders

Outside of New York, Alaska, Illinois, Hawaii, New Jersey and Minnesota also offer electricians a healthy chunk of change, all with an average salary of over $70k/year.

Meanwhile, Oregon, California, Washington and Massachusetts round out the top 10 US states for electrical wages, all boasting average electrician salaries of over $68k/year.

Even the lowest-earning states earn over $43k/annum on average which translates to well over £33k a year, which is nothing to sneer at either.

 

Become an Electrician

These facts and figures coming out of “The Land of Opportunity” reinforce the positive attitudes towards electrical work domestically as a viable trade that’s well worth pursuing as a career. Electricians in the UK & USA earn enough money to live comfortable lives, so an electrical career is an appealing option on both sides of the pond.

Whether you’re a young person looking to enter the working world as part of the electrical trade or an experienced worker considering making the switch from your current job to retrain as an electrician, Access Training UK can help make your electric dreams a reality.

At Access Training UK, we have a variety of electrician courses available that are specifically designed to efficiently and effectively allow you to learn how to become an electrician without any prior experience.

Meanwhile, we also offer additional courses for existing electrical professionals looking to hone their craft and develop their skills to become even better in their field of work. Whether you’re a novice or a seasoned veteran, we can help you achieve your goals of becoming a better you.

 

For more information on electrician courses from Access Training UK, why not drop us a line today? Call now on 0800 345 7492 or get in touch online by clicking the button below.

Contact Us

Become an electrician

If you're looking for a rewarding new career, then you may want to think about becoming an electrician. Gaining your electrical qualifications and starting down this path can be challenging, but the rewards are well worth it.

 

Why become an electrician?

  • Electricians commonly make upwards of £30,000 per year (according to totaljobs.com)

  • You'll have the opportunity to be your own boss and choose your hours

  • Qualified electricians are in very high demand right now - more than a quarter of firms have reported difficulties recruiting electricians

In addition to the above perks, electricians also enjoy a more active working day, making their way from one job to the next and engaging in practical, hands-on labour instead of sitting at a desk all week.

All of these are great reasons to become an electrician - but how exactly do you do it? Well, as with any trade, there are a number of industry-recognised qualifications associated with electrical work, and you'll obviously need to get qualified before you can start work; after all, electricity is very dangerous if you don't know what you're doing, and it's illegal for untrained personnel to operate on live electrical installations.

 

What qualifications do you need?

In order to start your electrician career, you will first need to earn an industry-recognised Level 3 electrical qualification, such as:

  • Level 3 Award in the In-Service Inspections and Testing of Electrical Equipment (PAT)

  • Level 3 Award in the Building Regulations for Electrical Installations in Dwellings

  • Level 3 Award in the Initial Verification and Certification of Electrical Installations

These qualifications each cover different skills/aspects of being an electrician, so you may find it worthwhile to complete a package course (e.g. our own Professional Electrical Course, which includes a number of Level 3 electrical qualifications) in order to give the best possible foundation for a varied, lucrative career. Simply click below to learn more!

Professional Electrical Course >

 

How to be an electrician

How long does it take to get qualified?

A lot of budding electricians get qualified over a number of years via an apprenticeship or NVQ diploma course, with a Level 3 qualification awarded upon completion. Other people obtain Level 1 and/or Level 2 qualifications before seeking trainee positions.

These aren't the only options, however. Fast-track electrical courses - which allow candidates to achieve Level 3 qualifications within a very short time frame - have become increasingly popular in recent years. This is an option you may wish to consider if you're looking to start your new career as an electrician ASAP.

Fast-track courses vary in duration, but dedicated students can complete their training and become qualified electricians in a matter of months.

 

What happens once you're qualified?

Once you have completed your electrical training and earned the necessary qualification(s), you can seek employment with a firm, or you can start your own business and be your own boss.

Many newly-qualified electricians choose the latter option, and it's not hard to see why: self-employed electricians can work as few or as many hours as they please, and their earnings aren't limited to their contracted salary. However, if you would prefer to be employed by someone else, that's a great choice too, and with electricians extremely in-demand at the moment, you should have no trouble finding a job.

If you'd like to become an electrician and train with Access Training, simply click below to browse our range of Electrical Courses and apply today to start your new career and life!

View our Electrical Courses >

 

2020 UPDATE: In response to the coronavirus outbreak, we now offer Live Online Learning - this means that you can start learning the fundamentals of electrical work at home!

Our virtual classroom sessions allow you to interact and ask questions as usual, plus you can rewatch each tutorial as many times as you wish. Once you've completed your electrical theory training, you will attend one of our training centres, where we'll teach you how to put that knowledge into practice. Contact Access Training now to learn more about our e-learning courses.

 

Wondering what it's like to train with us? Here's a review from one of our electricians in training:

If you need advice on any of our electrical training courses, or would just like to speak to one of our expert advisors about any of the courses we offer, don’t hesitate to get in touch. Call us on 0800 345 7492 or email info@accesstraininguk.co.uk

Should I become an eletrician?

Wondering whether or not to become an electrician? Well, we can certainly assure you that it's a very rewarding career choice. It's also a very stable source of income - electricity is a crucial part of modern life, and there are all sorts of important jobs that can only be done by qualified electricians.

Whether you are fresh out of school or looking for a new career a bit later in life, there are plenty of good reasons to become an electrician. We've put together just a few of them below.

Five Reasons Why You Should Become an Electrician

  • You can be your own boss

Becoming a qualified electrician will provide you with the option of starting your own business. If you've always loved the idea of being your own boss and choosing the hours you work, learning to work as an electrician could be a great choice for you. Many electricians are self-employed and demand for qualified electrical engineers is always high.

  • The salary is above average

Electricians typically earn more than any other tradespeople. According to Total Jobs, the average yearly salary for an electrician job is approximately £32,500. Of course, it's possible to earn even more than this through self-employed work, career progression, and bolstering your skillset with additional training courses and qualifications.

  • You can work anywhere

The great thing about an electrician's job is that they can work wherever it suits them. There is a huge need for electricians nationwide - not only does this give you the freedom to travel around, it also means you have great job stability.

  • You can start at any age

Due to the flexible nature of electrician work, it is possible to become a qualified electrician no matter how old you are. If you're straight out of school, you can start training to become an electrician right away; if you're looking to start a new career, you can start training for your electrician qualification alongside your current work.

  • You don't need a degree

Becoming an electrician does not require a university education, meaning you will not rack up thousands of pounds' worth of student loan debt before entering the world of work. Training to become an electrician costs far less than a university degree, and you can even train around your current schedule if you wish to continue working in the meantime. Here at Access Training, we offer courses to suit everyone's needs.

Find out more about Access Training's electrical courses >

Thinking of changing careers? Wondering if you'd enjoy life as a professional electrician? Read on to find out just what this job has to offer.

Electrician Career

Becoming an electrician can be a very tempting prospect, especially if your current job keeps you cooped up in an office all week. Electricians spend their working days out and about, travelling from one job to the next, fixing people's electrical problems and helping them to get their appliances up and running again.

If this sounds like a pretty rewarding way to make a living, well, it is! Here's a closer look at why electrical work may be a good career for you to pursue:

How much do electricians make?

According to the Office of National Statistics, the median salary for a UK electrician in 2016 was £30,765 per year. This was slightly higher than the figure for the previous year (which means that electricians' salaries are going up over time).

The same ONS survey found that electricians are the best-paid tradespeople of all, earning more on average than other professionals such as plumbers, carpenters, bricklayers and plasterers.

What hours do electricians work?

So how hard does an electrician have to work to earn upwards of £30k a year? Obviously, there's no set working week when you're a self-employed electrician - you can take on as many or as few jobs as you choose - but it goes without saying that the more work you do, the more money you'll make.

Depending on how much work you find (and how much of it you choose to take on at once), you may well find yourself doing 50-60hrs per week. However, it is more than possible to live comfortably as an electrician working significantly fewer hours than that.

How difficult is it to find work?

The UK is still suffering from something of a trade skills shortage, meaning that there simply aren't enough tradespeople available to do all the jobs that need doing around the country.

This means that electricians (as well as plumbers, bricklayers, etc.) are in very high demand right now, with many tradespeople finding that they're able to command a much higher price for their services than in the past. Interestingly, the result of last year's EU referendum seem to have exacerbated the skills shortage further, and UK electricians are sorely needed to replace the EU workers upon the trade industry relied until recently.

How do you become a qualified electrician?

If the perks of professional electrical work sounds too good to pass up, the next question you'll ask is probably 'what's the next step?'

View accredited electrician courses >

Electricity, of course, can be very dangerous, and so would-be electricians are required to hold a number of qualifications before carrying out any work. Here are the qualifications you MUST have:

  • Part P Domestic Installer
  • 17th Edition Electrical Regulations

These two certifications are included in our Essential Electrical Course. If you wish to learn more advanced skills and expand the range of jobs that you'll be able to undertake, you may wish to investigate our Professional Electrical Course and our Premier Electrical Course.

All of these training programmes are open to all, with no prior electrical knowledge or experience required. If you would like to train to become an electrician, please contact Access Training today!

Qualifications to Be an Electrician
 
At Access Training, we offer a combination of practical experience and theory training to equip our candidates with the knowledge and confidence to succeed in their chosen trade on completion of their course. We also provide them with the opportunity to gain the qualifications recognized in their specific field, so that they can access a suitable employment route and meet the quality standards expected in their industry. So you're thinking about being an electrician but now you're wondering, "what qualifications do I need to be an electrician?".
 
In short, you need the Part P Domestic Installer and 17th Edition Electrical Reg qualifications to begin your career, but each electrical qualification that you gain allows you to work on different jobs. To learn more about what qualifications you need to become a fully qualified electrician, keep reading. 
 
If you're looking to become a qualified electrician, it's highly important that you have the right qualifications in order to meet the industry's strict safety standards.  While you may already have some practical knowledge of working on electrical installations, it remains vital that you validate your abilities and knowledge by gaining the correct qualifications needed to progress in your career. Due to the dangerous nature of the job, as well as the thorough planning and knowledge required to carry out an installation or inspection, it remains vital for electricians to provide proof of their abilities with the appropriate certifications.
 
Here are the qualifications you'll need to establish your career and progress as an electrician:

Minimum Requirements:

  • Part P Domestic Installer - This qualification will allow you to work on electrical installations in the residential sector, in private housing, apartments and so on. Your knowledge will range from the maintenance of lighting, sockets, cooker circuits and consumer units, to more advanced jobs such as full house re-wires.

  • 17th Edition Electrical Regs - An essential companion to your training, this will inform you on the latest wiring regulations, allowing you to work safely and legally.
These qualifications are available on our Essential Electrical Course

Advanced Qualifications:

  • PAT Testing - This qualification equips you with the ability to prevent accidents involving portable, electrical appliances, allowing you to widen the work you are able to undertake on behalf of customers.

  • Fundamental Inspection & Testing - This qualification allows you to inspect and test new circuits on existing installations, while also allowing you to complete new installations.

  • Periodic Inspection & Testing - Designed for experienced electricians, this course will advance your existing knowledge of the inspection and testing of circuits, allowing you to issue safety reports and recommend any additional work.
These qualifications, along with the above, are available on our Professional Electrical Course

Further Progress:

  • Design, Erection and Verification - This covers the theory and design of electrical systems, qualifying you to design electrical systems for others to carry out, the very highest qualification in the electrical trade.
This qualification is available with all of the above, on our Premier Electrical Course
 
You can find our full range of electrical courses, as well as those covering individual units, here. If you are unsure about which of our courses is right for your experience level and ambitions, or if you have any further questions, please feel free to contact a member of our team today!
 

See also:

Is Being an Electrician Dangerous
 

When we are contacted by individuals researching electrical training courses, one of their main concerns regarding the profession is the obvious issue of safety. We are repeatedly (and rightly) reminded about the dangers associated with electricity on an everyday level, so it's easy to see why someone might be hesitant regarding the profession, with only the layman's understanding that they will be working with a highly dangerous power source.

Before you decide to become an electrician, it's important to familiarise yourself with the risks associated with the profession. While this may seem rather off-putting at first, it is actually far more beneficial to those looking to build a long-term career as an electrician. When you are aware of the dangers posed to you, as well as to colleagues and members of the public, you are more likely to keep in mind how important it is to follow proper health and safety procedures. As we have noted in a previous post, a career as an electrician can be both lucrative and rewarding, but to be a truly successful electrical engineer you must always keep in mind the possible dangers associated with the job.

Whether you decide to become a domestic installer or a site services electrician, there will be particular risks within your set area, as well as many that are universal. For example, domestic call-outs can be dangerous for electricians, as they are often called to rectify poor work attempted by inexperienced individuals. The best defence against these risks, along with those in many other trade professions, is knowledge. If you receive the right training and qualifications, before going on to uphold the strict guidelines required to work as an electrician, you will ensure that you are able to substantially reduce these risks, almost eliminating them altogether.

To make your choice a bit more straightforward, here are some simple tips for ensuring safety as an electrician:

  • Get the Proper Training - At Access Training, we offer several Electrical Courses which provide you with the opportunity to gain industry recognized qualifications, under the supervision of experienced installers. As industry experts, we uphold strict safety standards, to ensure that you are able to complete your training safely. 

  • Build on Your Knowledge - To progress in your career as an electrician, you will need to expand your knowledge not only by gaining practical experience, but by updating and advancing your existing qualifications. At Access Training, we not only provide courses for beginners, but also for experienced installers.

  • Keep up-to-date on Guidelines and Best Practices - As with any industry, the electrical trade has a strict set of procedures that if followed, should eliminate or reduce the risks of working with electrical currents. Useful guides can be found on the Electrical Safety First and HSE websites.
For more information about our Electrician Courses, please feel free to get in touch today!

The Essential Electrical Course is Access Training's basic electrical training programme. No experience is required to enrol, and so it's the perfect entry point for novices who want to learn the trade from scratch and work towards turning professional.

Interested? Here's everything you need to know about our Essential Electrical Course at a glance:

Who can take this course?

Anyone aged 18 or over. People of all races, genders and backgrounds are welcome, and as mentioned above, no prior electrical experience is necessary - our expert tutors will teach you everything from the absolute basics onward!

What will I learn?

Candidates who enrol on this course will cover a wide variety of topics, including:
  • Building regulations
  • Electrical safety
  • Earthing and bonding
  • Installing/replacing/checking components
The course has been designed to give candidates a thorough knowledge of domestic electrical work whilst covering both technical theory and practical electrician skills.

What qualifications will I earn?

Successful completion of the Essential Electrical Course will earn you two qualifications: the City & Guilds 17th Edition Electrical Regulations certificate, and the Part P Domestic Installer certificate. These two qualifications are a minimum requirement for all domestic electricians.

If you're ready to take the first step towards learning a new trade and becoming a domestic electrician, please click here or call 0800 345 7492 to enquire about our Essential Electrical Course.
If you're thinking of putting your time and effort into completing a training course, you'll want to do some through research before you begin, to make sure that your investment is worthwhile. Before committing to a new career, it's important that you consider whether or not the industry is right for you, by looking into the hours you could be expected to work, job availability, and of course, the financial aspects.
 
Last week, we wrote a piece about electricians being happy workers, but what about their earnings? Well, if you're considering becoming an electrician, you'll be pleased to find out that they are, on average, the highest paid of all tradespeople in the UK. In fact, in 2015 the average wage of an electrician rose to over £30k, making it the fastest growing pay-increase of any trade. Even newly qualified electricians can expect to earn £20k as a starting salary, making it an extremely attractive prospect for those looking to start out in the industry. 
 
If you're thinking of becoming an Electrician, here are a few encouraging facts about the progress routes and earning opportunities presented by the trade:

You Have The Opportunity To Be Your Own Boss

Once you've completed your training and gained enough experience in the industry, there are a wealth of opportunities to go it alone and become your own boss, particularly if you've built a strong relationship with your customers. Electricians who are self employed tend to earn much more than those employed by others, although it's important to consider the costs that go with this, such as tool hire and insurance.

The More You Learn, The More You Earn

One of the main advantages of becoming an electrician, is that you will be able to improve your salary by adding new skills to your portfolio. Once you've completed your training or have been in the profession for a few years, it's worth your while to train in new areas so that you can complete a wider range of work. Gaining advanced inspection and testing skills can prove to be a huge advantage in this trade, and can even allow you to move up another pay grade. Qualifications like The City and Guilds 2394 and 2395, which we offer here at Access Training, can make a huge difference to your range of opportunities and your value as a skilled tradesperson, allowing you to take your career to the next level. After this, you could also move on to a more advanced course such as the 2396 Electrical Design Course, which allows you to become qualified in the planning aspects of electrical installation, making you a suitable candidate for management roles in the future.

Flexible Pay Options 

Unlike certain professions, a career as an electrician offers a diverse range of pay options, from hourly/daily rates to opportunities for overtime. Hourly rates for an experienced electrician can range between £25 to £50, although it is often the case that a domestic installer will charge for work per day, with electricians usually earning between £200 and £300, with obvious increases in more prosperous areas. Due to the nature of the work, it's also common for projects to extend past their predicted lifespan, which means that opportunities for overtime should be available if you desire. Although the JIB discourages systematic overtime, it does not place restrictions in the case of breakdown and urgent repairs, providing you with opportunities to take on extra work as and when you want it.
 
To explore our full range of electrician courses and pave your way to a new, prosperous career, click here.
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